Four Georgia Tech Faculty Named IEEE Fellows

Dateline

Images

Jaydev Desai
Four Georgia Tech faculty members were named IEEE Fellows, effective January 1, 2018. They are Jaydev Desai, a professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME); Saibal Mukhopadhyay and Justin Romberg, both professors in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE); and Kevin James “Jim” Sangston, a senior research engineer in the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI).
Saibal Mukhopadhyay has been an assistant professor in ECE since 2007.
Kevin James "Jim" Sangston

Four Georgia Tech faculty members were named IEEE Fellows, effective January 1, 2018. They are Jaydev Desai, a professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME); Saibal Mukhopadhyay and Justin Romberg, both professors in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE); and Kevin James “Jim” Sangston, a senior research engineer in the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI).

The IEEE Grade of Fellow is conferred by the IEEE Board of Directors upon a person with an outstanding record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. IEEE Fellow is the highest grade of membership and is recognized by the technical community as a prestigious honor and an important career achievement.

Desai is being recognized “for contributions to medical and swarm robotics.” A BME faculty member since 2016, he also serves as associate director of the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines and as director of the newly launched Georgia Center for Medical Robotics. Desai’s research interests are primarily in image-guided surgical robotics, cancer diagnosis at the micro-scale, and rehabilitation robotics. Before joining Georgia Tech, Desai was a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Mukhopadhyay is being recognized “for contributions to energy-efficient and robust computing systems design.” An ECE faculty member since 2007, he leads the Gigascale Reliable Energy Efficient Nanosystem (GREEN) Lab, where he and his current team of 12 Ph.D. students develop smart machines that are able to generate usable information from real-time data for diverse applications - from self-powered sensors to mobile phones to high-performance servers. Mukhopadhyay’s team explores algorithmic principles to make these systems energy-efficient, robust, and secure, and pursue their experimental demonstration in silicon. 

Romberg is being recognized “for contributions to compressive sensing.” An ECE faculty member since 2006, he is the School’s associate chair for Research and holds the Schlumberger Professorship. In addition, Romberg serves as associate director for the Center for Machine Learning. He conducts research that is on the interface between signal processing, applied harmonic analysis, and optimization. Romberg and his current team of six Ph.D. students are interested in both the mathematical theory and real-world implementation of algorithms to make difficult processing tasks much easier.

Sangston is being recognized “for contributions to coherent detection of radar signals in clutter.” He initially came to GTRI from the U.S Naval Research Laboratory in 1996. His research in target detection in difficult clutter environments from the mid-1990s up till the present time has been a fruitful source of ideas and motivation for many investigators pursuing advanced research on radar target detection problems throughout the world. He currently works in the Sensors and Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory (SEAL), where he conducts research that seeks to combine advanced geometric and algebraic ideas to solve challenging radar signal processing problems. 

The IEEE is the world’s leading professional association for advancing technology for humanity. Through its 400,000-plus members in 160 countries, the association is a leading authority on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power, and consumer electronics.

Dedicated to the advancement of technology, the IEEE publishes 30 percent of the world’s literature in the electrical and electronics engineering and computer science fields, and has developed more than 1,300 active industry standards.  The association also sponsors or co-sponsors nearly 1,700 international technical conferences each year.  To learn more about IEEE or the IEEE Fellow Program, please visit www.ieee.org.

Inan Wins ONR Young Investigator Award

Dateline

Images

Omer Inan

Omer T. Inan has received an Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award for his research project entitled “Wearable Assessment of Warfighter Blood Volume Status using Graph Mining Algorithms.” 

In this project, Inan will investigate wearable sensing systems and modern data analytics tools for estimating blood volume status for the Warfighter in austere environments. Reduced blood volume is experienced by the modern Warfighter in a variety of circumstances ranging from exsanguination to exertional heat stress, and can ultimately lead to shock or collapse. This project can benefit the health and performance of the Warfighter by enabling proactive measures to be taken in the field to reduce preventable deaths and improve performance. The technologies developed in this work can ultimately have broad use in civilian applications as well, ranging from trauma care to predicting cardiovascular collapse in persons working in warm environments with protective clothing.

Inan has been an assistant professor at the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering since 2013, where he also holds an adjunct faculty appointment in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering. Inan and his research team design clinically relevant medical devices and systems, and then translate them from the lab to patient care applications. They also develop new technologies for monitoring chronic diseases at home, such as heart failure.

Inan is a member of the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and a program faculty member for the Interdisciplinary Bioengineering Graduate Program. His most recent honors include the Georgia Tech Sigma Xi Young Faculty Award (2017) and the Lockheed Dean’s Excellence in Teaching Award in (2016); he is also a senior member of IEEE.

Butera Named as IEEE EMBS Distinguished Lecturer

Dateline

Images

Robert J. Butera

Robert J. Butera has been named as a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) for a two-year term, which began on January 1, 2018 and will end on December 31, 2019.

The areas in which Butera will present lectures include bioelectric medicine, electrophysiology, nerve stimulation, computational neuroscience, and the maker movement and problem-based learning.

A member of the Georgia Tech faculty since 1999, Butera is the associate dean for Research and Innovation in the College of Engineering. He is a professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and holds a joint appointment in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering. 

Prior to joining the Dean’s Office, Butera led the Neural Engineering Center from 2014-2016 and served as founding faculty director of the Grand Challenges Living Learning Community from 2012-2015. He is a member of the Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and is a faculty member in the Interdisciplinary Bioengineering Graduate Program; he served as the program’s director from 2005-2008. 

Butera is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and he is the vice president for publications for IEEE EMBS.

Three Georgia Tech Faculty Named IEEE Fellows

Dateline

Keywords

Images

Stanislav Emelianov
Richard Fujimoto
Vivek Sarkar

Georgia Tech faculty members Stanislav Emelianov, Richard Fujimoto, and Vivek Sarkar have been named IEEE Fellows, the society’s highest grade of membership, effective January 1, 2020. A distinction conferred by the IEEE Board of Directors, it is considered by the technical community to be a prestigious honor and an important career achievement.

Emelianov was recognized for his contributions to ultrasound elasticity and photoacoustic imaging. He is the Joseph M. Pettit Chair Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar. An expert in biomedical imaging instrumentation and nanoagents for imaging and therapy, Emelianov has joint appointments with the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University. He is also a professor of Radiology at the Emory University School of Medicine and is affiliated with Winship Cancer Institute and other clinical units. 

Emelianov is the director of the Ultrasound Imaging and Therapeutics Research Laboratory, where his group works on the discovery, development, and clinical translation of diagnostic imaging and therapeutic instrumentation, augmented with theranostic nanoagents–small particles that can diagnose and then treat a specific disease. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and he has served as vice president for Ultrasonics of the IEEE Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control Society.

Fujimoto, a Regents’ Professor in the School of Computational Science and Engineering, was honored for his work in the field of parallel and distributed discrete event simulation. Discrete event simulations model operations within a system and have uses in a wide variety of applications. Fujimoto has authored and co-authored hundreds of technical papers on the subject as well as several books, which span application areas including transportation systems, telecommunication networks, and multiprocessor and defense systems.

He was also named a 2019 Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference (I/ITSEC) Fellow. The announcement for both of these recognitions came only two years after he was named an Association for Computing Machinery Fellow in 2017.

Sarkar, the Stephen P. Fleming Chair of Telecommunications in the School of Computer Science and co-director of the Center for Research into Novel Computing Hierarchies, received his distinction for contributions to compiler technologies for high-performance computing. His work in this area spans multiple aspects of parallel computing software including programming languages, compilers, runtime systems, and debugging and verification systems for high performance computers.

Sarkar has numerous recognitions in the field. He became a member of the IBM Academy of Technology in 1995 and an ACM Fellow in 2008. He has been serving as a member of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) since 2009 and has served on CRA’s Board of Directors since 2015. 

The IEEE – short for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers – is the world’s leading professional association for advancing technology for humanity. Through its 420,000-plus members in more than 160 countries, the association is a leading authority on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications, biomedical engineering, electric power, and consumer electronics.

Dedicated to the advancement of technology, the IEEE publishes nearly one-third of the world’s literature in the electrical and electronics engineering and computer science fields, and has developed nearly 1,300 active industry standards.  The association also sponsors or co-sponsors more than 1,900 international technical conferences and events each year. 

Three Georgia Tech Faculty Named IEEE Fellows

Dateline

Keywords

Images

Stanislav Emelianov
Richard Fujimoto
Vivek Sarkar

Georgia Tech faculty members Stanislav Emelianov, Richard Fujimoto, and Vivek Sarkar have been named IEEE Fellows, the society’s highest grade of membership, effective January 1, 2020. A distinction conferred by the IEEE Board of Directors, it is considered by the technical community to be a prestigious honor and an important career achievement.

Emelianov was recognized for his contributions to ultrasound elasticity and photoacoustic imaging. He is the Joseph M. Pettit Chair Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar. An expert in biomedical imaging instrumentation and nanoagents for imaging and therapy, Emelianov has joint appointments with the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University. He is also a professor of Radiology at the Emory University School of Medicine and is affiliated with Winship Cancer Institute and other clinical units. 

Emelianov is the director of the Ultrasound Imaging and Therapeutics Research Laboratory, where his group works on the discovery, development, and clinical translation of diagnostic imaging and therapeutic instrumentation, augmented with theranostic nanoagents–small particles that can diagnose and then treat a specific disease. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and he has served as vice president for Ultrasonics of the IEEE Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control Society.

Fujimoto, a Regents’ Professor in the School of Computational Science and Engineering, was honored for his work in the field of parallel and distributed discrete event simulation. Discrete event simulations model operations within a system and have uses in a wide variety of applications. Fujimoto has authored and co-authored hundreds of technical papers on the subject as well as several books, which span application areas including transportation systems, telecommunication networks, and multiprocessor and defense systems.

He was also named a 2019 Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference (I/ITSEC) Fellow. The announcement for both of these recognitions came only two years after he was named an Association for Computing Machinery Fellow in 2017.

Sarkar, the Stephen P. Fleming Chair of Telecommunications in the School of Computer Science and co-director of the Center for Research into Novel Computing Hierarchies, received his distinction for contributions to compiler technologies for high-performance computing. His work in this area spans multiple aspects of parallel computing software including programming languages, compilers, runtime systems, and debugging and verification systems for high performance computers.

Sarkar has numerous recognitions in the field. He became a member of the IBM Academy of Technology in 1995 and an ACM Fellow in 2008. He has been serving as a member of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) since 2009 and has served on CRA’s Board of Directors since 2015. 

The IEEE – short for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers – is the world’s leading professional association for advancing technology for humanity. Through its 420,000-plus members in more than 160 countries, the association is a leading authority on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications, biomedical engineering, electric power, and consumer electronics.

Dedicated to the advancement of technology, the IEEE publishes nearly one-third of the world’s literature in the electrical and electronics engineering and computer science fields, and has developed nearly 1,300 active industry standards.  The association also sponsors or co-sponsors more than 1,900 international technical conferences and events each year. 

Richard Fujimoto Among Three Georgia Tech Faculty Named IEEE Fellows

Dateline

Keywords

Images

Richard Fujimoto
Stanislav Emelianov
Vivek Sarkar

Georgia Tech faculty members Stanislav Emelianov, Richard Fujimoto, and Vivek Sarkar have been named IEEE Fellows, the society’s highest grade of membership, effective January 1, 2020. A distinction conferred by the IEEE Board of Directors, it is considered by the technical community to be a prestigious honor and an important career achievement.

Emelianov was recognized for his contributions to ultrasound elasticity and photoacoustic imaging. He is the Joseph M. Pettit Chair Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar. An expert in biomedical imaging instrumentation and nanoagents for imaging and therapy, Emelianov has joint appointments with the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University. He is also a professor of Radiology at the Emory University School of Medicine and is affiliated with Winship Cancer Institute and other clinical units. 

Emelianov is the director of the Ultrasound Imaging and Therapeutics Research Laboratory, where his group works on the discovery, development, and clinical translation of diagnostic imaging and therapeutic instrumentation, augmented with theranostic nanoagents–small particles that can diagnose and then treat a specific disease. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and he has served as vice president for Ultrasonics of the IEEE Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control Society.

Fujimoto, a Regents’ Professor in the School of Computational Science and Engineering, was honored for his work in the field of parallel and distributed discrete event simulation. Discrete event simulations model operations within a system and have uses in a wide variety of applications. Fujimoto has authored and co-authored hundreds of technical papers on the subject as well as several books, which span application areas including transportation systems, telecommunication networks, and multiprocessor and defense systems.

He was also named a 2019 Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference (I/ITSEC) Fellow. The announcement for both of these recognitions came only two years after he was named an Association for Computing Machinery Fellow in 2017.

Sarkar, the Stephen P. Fleming Chair of Telecommunications in the School of Computer Science and co-director of the Center for Research into Novel Computing Hierarchies, received his distinction for contributions to compiler technologies for high-performance computing. His work in this area spans multiple aspects of parallel computing software including programming languages, compilers, runtime systems, and debugging and verification systems for high performance computers.

Sarkar has numerous recognitions in the field. He became a member of the IBM Academy of Technology in 1995 and an ACM Fellow in 2008. He has been serving as a member of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) since 2009 and has served on CRA’s Board of Directors since 2015. 

The IEEE – short for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers – is the world’s leading professional association for advancing technology for humanity. Through its 420,000-plus members in more than 160 countries, the association is a leading authority on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications, biomedical engineering, electric power, and consumer electronics.

Dedicated to the advancement of technology, the IEEE publishes nearly one-third of the world’s literature in the electrical and electronics engineering and computer science fields, and has developed nearly 1,300 active industry standards.  The association also sponsors or co-sponsors more than 1,900 international technical conferences and events each year. 

Calhoun Tapped for IEEE EMBS Technical Achievement Award

Dateline

Images

Vince Calhoun

Vince Calhoun has been chosen as the recipient of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) Technical Achievement Award. Calhoun is receiving this award “for contributions to data-driven processing of multimodal brain imaging and genetic data.”

Calhoun and his research team have developed data-driven approaches to combine or “fuse” multimodal brain imaging and genomics data, such as structural and functional MRI and single nucleotide polymorphism data. They are using these approaches to extract biological fingerprints of healthy and disordered brains resulting from conditions such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. These approaches are also being used to develop predictors of brain disorder, treatment response, and other measures with a goal of moving toward biology-based markers of illness. 

Calhoun is a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar and the founding director of the Center for Translational Research in Neuroimaging and Data Science (TReNDS) at Georgia State University. TReNDS is a tri-institutional effort among Georgia State, Georgia Tech, and Emory University. Effective July 1, Calhoun will also lead the Georgia State/Georgia Tech Center for Advanced Brain Imaging (CABI). He holds faculty appointments in Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Institute Diversity Honors Four Gender Equity Champions at the Eighth Annual Diversity Symposium

Dateline

Images

In light of this year’s Diversity Symposium theme, “Celebrating Women at Georgia Tech,” Institute Diversity created the Gender Equity Champion Awards to recognize members of the faculty, staff, and student body, and a unit (office, department, school, or lab) for significantly demonstrating gender diversity, equity, and inclusion within the campus community.Photo by Camille Pendley
The Gender Equity Champion Award winner in the unit category was the School of Physics. In this photo, Institute Diversity Associate Vice President Julie Ancis presents the award to Graduate Research Assistant Andrea Welsh and Associate Professor Flavio Fenton from the School of Physics and College of Sciences Dean and Sutherland Chair Paul Goldbart.Diversity is a top priority to the School of Physics, and the school is committed to recruiting and retaining women faculty and students. “For the past two ye
Mary Frank Fox, ADVANCE Professor in the School of Public Policy and co-director of the Center for the Study of Women, Science, and Technology, was the Gender Equity Champion Award winner in the faculty category.Her research focuses on gender, science, and academia — the study of women and men in academic and scientific organizations and occupations — with significant implications for science and technology policy. “The Gender Equity Champion Award embodies values that are close to my heart — equita
Shannon Sullivan, graduate program manager of the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, was the Gender Equity Champion Award winner in the staff category.She is a licensed professional counselor whose passion is empowering young people to develop themselves personally and professionally. “My work is about daily conversations with people. For someone to recognize that our individual conversations make a difference in students’ lives, I am deeply touched by this honor,” remarked Sulli
Kendall Rankin, undergraduate student in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering, was the Gender Equity Champion Award winner in the student category.She is the founder and executive director of The Diamond Campaign, a nonprofit she started during her sophomore year to empower women through service and education. As Rankin stated, “I believe that Georgia Tech is committed to gender equity as we have made huge strides in recent years, but I encourage each of you to find a way t

In light of this year’s Diversity Symposium theme, “Celebrating Women at Georgia Tech,” Institute Diversity created the Gender Equity Champion Awards to recognize members of the faculty, staff, and student body, and a unit (office, department, school, or lab) for significantly demonstrating gender diversity, equity, and inclusion within the campus community.

The Gender Equity Champion Award winners were honored at the Eighth Annual Diversity Symposium on Friday, September 16.

“I am excited to be part of an effort that celebrates and recognizes the remarkable contributions of campus community members who are advancing gender equity at Georgia Tech,” said Julie Ancis, associate vice president of Institute Diversity and chair of the Gender Equity Champion Awards Committee.

Gender Equity Champion Award recipients have demonstrated one or more of the following in the last three years:

  • Commitment to gender diversity, equity, and inclusion.
  • Leadership in building a culture of gender inclusion and equity.
  • Behavior that illustrates commitment to the inclusion of persons within the Institute who represent the gender diversity of the Georgia Tech community.
  • Organized, conducted, and/or supported events and activities that promote respect and inclusion related to gender and gender expression.

Award recipients included:

  • Faculty Award – Mary Frank Fox, ADVANCE Professor, School of Public Policy, and co-director, Center for the Study of Women, Science, and Technology
  • Staff Award – Shannon Sullivan, graduate program manager, Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering
  • Student Award – Kendall Rankin, undergraduate student, H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering
  • Unit Award – School of Physics

Mary Frank Fox’s research focuses on gender, science, and academia — the study of women and men in academic and scientific organizations and occupations — with significant implications for science and technology policy. “The Gender Equity Champion Award embodies values that are close to my heart — equitable conditions that benefit all,” said Fox.

Shannon Sullivan is a licensed professional counselor whose passion is empowering young people to develop themselves personally and professionally. “My work is about daily conversations with people. For someone to recognize that our individual conversations make a difference in students’ lives, I am deeply touched by this honor,” remarked Sullivan.

Kendall Rankin is the founder and executive director of The Diamond Campaign, a nonprofit she started during her sophomore year to empower women through service and education. As Rankin stated, “I believe that Georgia Tech is committed to gender equity as we have made huge strides in recent years, but I encourage each of you to find a way to support women on campus and to ensure we have an inclusive community.”

Diversity is a top priority to the School of Physics, and the school is committed to recruiting and retaining women faculty and students. “For the past two years, the incoming class of graduate students is 30 percent female in the School of Physics, which is currently above the national average,” explained Pablo Laguna, school chair and professor.

These awards at the Eighth Annual Diversity Symposium come on the heels of Georgia Tech’s Gender Equity Initiatives announcement at the Institute Address in fall 2016 and the Office of the President’s listening sessions on gender equity in fall 2015.

“One of the impact areas of the Gender Equity Initiatives is to create recognition opportunities and increase the visibility of the Institute’s commitment to gender equity,” said Archie Ervin, vice president of Institute Diversity. “The annual Diversity Symposium is one of the best opportunities to come together as a campus community, honor campus leaders who are committed to diversity, and have robust, informed discussions on important issues like gender equity.”

To learn more about the Gender Equity Champion Awards and the Diversity Symposium, visit diversity.gatech.edu.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

Contact

Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

News room topics

Subscribe to Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering