Harris Tapped for 40 Under 40 Awards

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Joyelle Harris was one of 40 individuals from the metro Atlanta area who were honored at the 2017 Atlanta Business Chronicle 40 Under 40 Awards. An academic professional in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), Harris and her fellow honorees were recognized at an event held at the Foundry at Puritan Mill on November 8.

The 40 Under 40 Awards honor young movers and shakers who are making a mark in their industries and leading in their communities. Harris was specifically recognized for her work as director of the Engineering for Social Innovation (ESI) Center and as co-director of the Grand Challenges Scholars Program, both of which are initiatives housed in the Georgia Tech College of Engineering (CoE), and for her work as executive director of the Council of Schools and Services for the Blind. She was also honored for her prior contributions to the community through her work at Oak Ridge National Labs, Exponent, and Intel.   

Through ESI, Harris enables hundreds of students each year to use their coursework and technical skills for significant, positive social impact in community projects throughout Atlanta and all over the world. In her ESI work, she empowers her community partners by incorporating their needs and desires into solutions that are sustainable and desirable. In the CoE Grand Challenges Scholars Program, Harris works with students who want to tackle today’s science, engineering, and technology challenges in areas like cybersecurity and global access to healthcare.

Harris was also recognized for her work with several student organizations, including Engineers Without Borders, which helps to improve the infrastructure of communities throughout the developing world, and Enterprise to Empower, an organization that helps students launch nontraditional, impact careers.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Butera Named as IEEE EMBS Distinguished Lecturer

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Robert J. Butera

Robert J. Butera has been named as a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) for a two-year term, which began on January 1, 2018 and will end on December 31, 2019.

The areas in which Butera will present lectures include bioelectric medicine, electrophysiology, nerve stimulation, computational neuroscience, and the maker movement and problem-based learning.

A member of the Georgia Tech faculty since 1999, Butera is the associate dean for Research and Innovation in the College of Engineering. He is a professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and holds a joint appointment in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering. 

Prior to joining the Dean’s Office, Butera led the Neural Engineering Center from 2014-2016 and served as founding faculty director of the Grand Challenges Living Learning Community from 2012-2015. He is a member of the Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and is a faculty member in the Interdisciplinary Bioengineering Graduate Program; he served as the program’s director from 2005-2008. 

Butera is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and he is the vice president for publications for IEEE EMBS.

Herrmann Named SEG Distinguished Lecturer

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Felix Herrmann

Felix Herrmann has been named as a 2019 Distinguished Lecturer for the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) for the period covering January through June 2019. 

In addition to recognizing an individual's contributions to the science or application of geophysics, this position is an active effort to promote geophysics, stimulate general scientific and professional interest, expand technical horizons, and provide a connection to SEG activities and practices.

During his term as an SEG Distinguished Lecturer, Herrmann will travel around the world to speak about the use of compressive sensing in exploration seismology. More specifically, he will speak about how techniques from compressive sensing can be used to look for new and innovative ways to collect time-lapse seismic data at reduced costs and reduced environmental impact. Herrmann will demonstrate that compressive seismic data acquisition removes the need to acquire expensive densely sampled and replicated field surveys, which can lead to an order of magnitude improvement in acquisition efficiency.

Herrmann joined the Georgia Tech faculty in 2017 as a professor in the Georgia Tech School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and as a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Energy. He holds joint appointments in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the School of Computational Science and Engineering.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Antonakakis Appointed to Dean’s Professorship

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Manos Antonakakis has been appointed to the Dean’s Professorship, effective June 1, 2020.  This professorship resides in the College of Engineering Dean’s Office at Georgia Tech.

Antonakakis is an associate professor in Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and is the co-director of the Center for Cyber Operations Enquiry and Unconventional Sensing (COEUS). He also leads the Astrolavos Lab, where his students conduct research in the areas of attack attribution, network security and privacy, intrusion detection, and data mining. 

During his tenure as a faculty member at Georgia Tech, Antonakakis has raised more than $53 million in research funding from government agencies and the private sector. In April 2018, he received the Georgia Tech Outstanding Achievement in Research Program Development Award for acquiring a $17.3 million award from the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to establish the science of attack attribution. 

Antonakakis is the author of multiple U.S. patents in the areas of security and machine learning, and his Ph.D. thesis is considered the seminal work in Domain Name System (DNS) security and DNS-based statistical learning. It was the first Ph.D. thesis in the world to cover statistical learning in DNS security. 

Antonakakis' research group’s work has been publicized through news releases focused on faster detection and clean-up of network infections, monitoring of Internet of Things security, combosquatting, and analyzing network traffic to determine malware infection. Prior to joining the ECE faculty in 2013, he served as chief scientist at Damballa, where his research supported early threat detection and prevention tools. Antonakakis also worked for IBM/ISS and was a guest researcher at the National Institute of Standards and Technology - U.S. Department of Commerce. 

Antonakakis currently serves as the co-chair of the Academic Committee for the Messaging Anti-Abuse Working Group (MAAWG), and he was instrumental in helping Georgia Tech become the first university to join MAAWG in 2015.  Additionally, Antonakakis’ service to the DoD, intelligence community, and law enforcement organizations has been highly significant. In his most recent recognition, Antonakakis received the Certificate of Appreciation for service provided to the 2nd Cyber Protection Battalion of the U.S. Army at Fort Gordon, Georgia.

Three Tech Faculty Named AAAS Fellows

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American Association for the Advancement of Science
Christopher Jones, David Sherrill, and Howie Weiss.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) has named three Georgia Tech professors as 2014 Fellows. AAAS is the world’s largest general scientific society, and election as a Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers.  

One of the new AAAS Fellows comes from the College of Engineering and two come from the College of Sciences. The Fellows were announced in the journal Science and will be honored at the Fellows Forum, held Feb. 14, 2015, at the AAAS Annual Meeting in San Jose, California.

The new AAAS Fellows at Georgia Tech are:

Christopher W. Jones, New-Vision Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Jones was honored for distinguished contributions to the fields of chemistry and chemical engineering, particularly developments in catalysis sciences and carbon dioxide capture.

C. David Sherrill, professor of chemistry and biochemistry. Sherrill was honored for advances in electronic structure theory and their application in seminal studies of non-covalent pi interactions.

Howard (Howie) Weiss, professor of mathematics. Weiss was honored for distinguished contributions to dynamical systems theory, studies of properties of Gibbs measures and entropy, and applications to models of social phenomena including urban growth.

AAAS is an international nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing science around the world by serving as an educator, leader, spokesperson, and professional association. AAAS publishes the journal Science as well as many scientific newsletters, books, and reports, and spearheads programs that raise the bar of understanding for science worldwide. The three Georgia Tech faculty members were among 401 Fellows elected by the AAAS Council in November. 

 

Location

Atlanta, GA

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Kristen Bailey
Institute Communications

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Gerhardt Named Goizueta Foundation Faculty Chair

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Rosario Gerhardt, professor in the School of Materials Science and Engineering and the Goizueta Foundation Faculty Chair

Rosario Gerhardt, professor in the School of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), has been named Tech’s new Goizueta Foundation Faculty Chair.

The Goizueta chair position is awarded to outstanding tenured faculty who have demonstrated excellence in research and teaching, as well as leadership in the campus Hispanic community and beyond.

“It’s exciting to me to be able to share my story with people,” said Gerhardt, who was born in Peru and had the experience of being an international student when she came to the U.S. for college. She studied and worked at Carroll College, Columbia University, and Rutgers University before coming to Tech as an associate professor in 1991. 

In the interim years, she was granted tenure and later promoted to full professor in MSE. In her academic work, she has published more than 200 papers, garnered more than $5 million in research funding, and has personally advised and mentored more than 100 individuals at all levels, including faculty members, postdoctoral fellows, graduate and undergraduate students, and K-12 teachers and their students. Her scientific research focuses on determining the underlying structure of materials and how that structure affects a given material’s electrical, optical, and magnetic response. Her work has applications in areas such as electronics, energy, transportation, and security.

In addition to serving as an academic mentor, Gerhardt has also served as a guest speaker and supporter for several campus groups and is principal empowerment officer for HOLA, the employee resource group for Hispanics, Latinos, and allies. In 2011 she took on the part-time role of executive director for the Office of Institute Diversity.

Funding is provided to the Goizueta chair for academic and research activities and to support efforts related to service as a role model for Hispanic students. Gerhardt plans to use some funds for updating lab equipment, activities with recipients of the Goizueta Foundation Fellowship, and continuing her work with the GoSTEM outreach program. Though she works with these students already through her role with Institute Diversity, she hopes to grow those activities in the future.

“Being the new Goizueta Foundation Chair will give me a little more clout and more opportunities to interact with them on new projects,” she said.

In her personal life, Gerhardt has raised two female engineers, both Tech graduates, who work in science and technology.

“She is a true embodiment of what the Goizueta Faculty Chair at Georgia Tech should be — passionate about her job as a professor, committed to mentoring the underrepresented, and providing inspiration by being an example of what one can accomplish at an institution such as Georgia Tech,” said Naresh Thadhani, professor and chair for MSE.

Gerhardt looks forward to leveraging the role and resources of the Goizueta chair to continue her service as a role model and advocate for other underrepresented minorities on campus.  

“It’s really important for students to know that it is possible to do whatever you set your mind to,” she said. “Sometimes it requires certain sacrifices, but the bottom line is, no one should ever feel that because they are from a particular group that they don’t have the opportunity. All that is needed is hard work and the will to do it.”

Gerhardt’s appointment officially begins Aug. 15.

 

Location

Atlanta, GA

Contact

Kristen Bailey
Institute Communications

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Three Faculty Elected to National Academy of Engineering

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William R. T. Oakes Professor and AE Chair Dr. Vigor Yang

College of Engineering faculty members Deepak Divan, Vigor Yang and Ajit P. Yoganathan were recently elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE).

Election to NAE is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer. Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to "engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature," and to the "pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education."

“Deepak, Vigor and Ajit have made exceptional contributions to their fields and to Georgia Tech,” said Gary S. May, dean of the College of Engineering. “This is a tremendous honor for these outstanding and deserving researchers. We are honored to have them as part of our engineering faculty.”

Divan was recognized by the NAE for “design and commercialization of advanced power conversion technologies for improved quality and controllability of the power grid.” He joined Georgia Tech in 2004 to create a strong program in the application of power electronics and related technologies to power systems and demanding defense and industrial applications. He has 40 issued and pending patents and has published about 250 technical papers, including more than 12 prize papers. Most recently he has been president, chief technical officer, and co-founder of Varentec, Inc., a company that builds power management and monitoring solutions for the electric grid.

NAE recognized Yang for his “contributions to combustion physics in propulsion systems and to aerospace engineering education.” Yang’s research encompasses a wide spectrum of topics, including combustion instabilities in propulsion systems, chemically reacting flows in air-breathing and rocket engines, combustion of energetic materials, high-pressure transport phenomena and combustion, active control of gas-turbine combustion dynamics, and nanotechnologies for propulsion and energetic applications. He has established, as the principal or co-principal investigator, more than 68 research projects dealing with fluid dynamics and combustion in aerospace propulsion and power systems.

Yoganathan was elected for his contributions to “improvements in the biomechanics of prosthetic heart valves and the development of heart repair devices.” He has published more than 250 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters in leading biomedical journals and books. He came to Georgia Tech in 1979, and his research deals with experimental and computational fluid mechanics as it pertains to artificial heart valves, left and right sides of the heart, and congenital heart diseases. His work involves the use of laser Doppler velocimetry, digital particle image velocimetry, Doppler ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging to non-invasively study and quantify blood flow patterns in the cardiovascular system.

Read more about the new NAE members.

Georgia Tech Launches Ph.D. in Ocean Science and Engineering

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Applications for inaugural class are due Dec. 8, 2016

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Georgia Tech now offers an interdisciplinary Ph.D. program in Ocean Science and Engineering (OSE). The new program aims to train ocean scientists and engineers by combining basic and applied sciences with innovative ocean technologies. Students in the program will participate in interdisciplinary research at the frontiers of the physical, biological, chemical, and human dimensions of ocean systems.

A partnership of the College of Sciences and the College of Engineering, the program involves faculty from the Schools of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (EAS), Biological Sciences, and Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE). The program’s director and co-director are Emanuele Di Lorenzo and Annalisa Bracco, both professors in EAS.

“The greatest challenges in research result from the growing complexity, interconnectedness, and linkages of phenomena, which cannot be addressed within traditional disciplinary boundaries. This applies especially to the ocean—the largest environmental resource on Earth,” Bracco said. “Chemical, biological, and physical processes in ocean cannot be viewed in isolation.”

What’s needed, she said, is an integrated approach to interpreting scientific data and developing effective solutions to immediate problems, such as loss of coral reefs, and their long-term consequences, such as loss of biodiversity.

“Georgia Tech is one of a very few institutions with the engineering and scientific prowess and the interdisciplinary culture to effectively address these critical challenges,” Di Lorenzo said.

Kevin A. Haas, in CEE, said the program brings together for the first time the large number of researchers focused on ocean studies but scattered across Georgia Tech academic units. “We will be able to take a more holistic approach,” he said, “through collaborations between scientists and engineers to address issues such as ecological impacts of global climate change and develop engineering solutions to adapt to or mitigate these impacts.”

OSE seeks students with interest and curiosity in the program’s themes: ocean technology, ocean sustainability, ocean and climate, marine living resources, and coastal ocean systems.

“Our goal is to develop a pipeline of in-demand ocean experts for industry, government, and academia,” Di Lorenzo said.

Graduate programs in ocean sciences and engineering are not new. Georgia Tech’s OSE is unique in combining basic and applied research in one degree offering. “We aim to find solutions to ocean-related problems by integrating science and engineering. This is a fundamental challenge that is not addressed by competing programs,” Di Lorenzo said.

The inaugural class of OSE students will enroll in Fall 2017. Applications are due Dec. 8, 2016.

For more information, contact:

Emanuele Di Lorenzo, edl@gatech.edu

Annalisa Bracco, abracco@gatech.edu

Hollie Meyer, hollie.meyer@eas.gatech.edu

Location

Atlanta

Email

maureen.rouhi@cos.gatech.edu

Contact

A. Maureen Rouhi

Director of Communications

College of Sciences

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