Colin Potts Accepts Provost Position at Missouri S&T

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Colin Potts, vice provost for undergraduate education and professor of interactive computing at Georgia Tech, has accepted a position as provost and executive vice chancellor of Academic Affairs at Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T). He will be at Tech through late May.

Potts has led Georgia Tech’s Office of Undergraduate Education since 2012, overseeing offices and programs affecting undergraduate education including Serve-Learn-Sustain, the Honors Program, Undergraduate Advising and Transition, Academic Enrichment Programs, Tutoring and Academic Support, Complete College Georgia and Retention, Summer Session Initiatives, the Career Center, and Pre-Graduate and Pre-Professional Advising. He has led or convened task forces on academic advising, the academic calendar, and curricular flexibility. On the national scene, Potts is president of the Reinvention Collaborative, a coalition of more than 80 national research universities focusing on undergraduate education in research-intensive environments.

“We have all benefited tremendously from Colin Potts’ commitment to the students, faculty, and staff of Georgia Tech,” said Steven McLaughlin, provost and executive vice president for Academic Affairs. “The same innovative spirit in his teaching and research is reflected in his leadership. He redesigned and strengthened academic advising and led the consolidation of Career Services and Cooperative Education to create C2D2. I am also personally very grateful for his work on the Strategic Plan Steering Committee and the Georgia Tech Covid-19 Task Force. Over the past almost three decades, he has left his mark on Georgia Tech, and I know he will make great contributions in his new role at Missouri S&T.”

Potts joined the Georgia Tech faculty in 1992 and is a professor in the School of Interactive Computing. His research has spanned the fields of requirements engineering, software design methods, human-computer interaction, and information privacy. Potts designed and taught courses at all levels in software engineering, human-computer interaction design and the social implications of computing, and received the 2010 William “Gus” Baird Faculty Teaching Award and the 2012 Eichholz Faculty Teaching Award. He frequently teaches introductory courses in computer science to non-majors. He has conducted nine study abroad programs in Oxford and Barcelona, and has led a living learning community.

In 2014, the Georgia Tech Undergraduate House of Representatives presented him with the Dean James E. Dull Administrator of the Year Award. That same year, the Georgia Tech Student Ambassadors presented him with the Modern Day Aristotle Award. 

Before joining Georgia Tech, Potts worked as a senior member of the technical staff at Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation in Austin. A native of England, he earned a Ph.D. from Sheffield University in cognitive psychology.

The Office of Undergraduate Education will remain under his leadership while a search commences. Details on the search process and the leadership transition will be announced later this spring.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

patti.futrell@comm.gatech.edu

Contact

Patti Futrell

Faculty Communications Program Manager

Institute Communications

Town Halls Take Long View on Tech Innovation, Library

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The Office of the Provost provided updates on two important parts of Georgia Tech’s learning environment last week: education innovation and the Library Renewal Project. 

At the education innovation event on Oct. 20, Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Rafael L. Bras announced the launch of the Creating the Next in Education Task Force, a group that will dedicate itself to continuing Tech’s pursuit of cutting-edge innovation in education.

Bras also discussed the reorganization of the Center for 21st Century Universities (C21U) that will bring that group under the Provost’s Office. 

Rich DeMillo, director of C21U, talked about the upcoming Learning Management System pilot to support classroom instruction and collaborative work. The faculty-led project will evaluate three different systems for use on campus, in addition to the T-Square system already in place.

The Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning, Professional Education, and Office of Information Technology also participated in the event. 

Library Renewal

The Oct. 22 event discussed the five-year project that is already underway, as the Georgia Tech and Emory University Joint Library Service Center (LSC) is scheduled to open in January 2016. Print collections will be moved to the joint LSC beginning in spring 2016. At the end of December, Crosland Tower will close to the public, with construction on this portion of the project beginning in summer 2016. Crosland is expected to be completed in 2018, at which point Price Gilbert will be cleared out for construction. The full complex is expected to reopen at that time. The phased approach will ensure that one of the two library buildings is in operation throughout the duration of the project.

One new physical element of the renovation will be a Library Store, which will function as the face of the Library. A teaching studio will give faculty and graduate students who teach an opportunity to try new teaching methods and technology, as well as learn new software and hardware features of classroom technology before the first day of class. 

An enhanced and expanded digital media center will have experts available to facilitate
the use of new technologies and tools used for scholarship and research. An innovation and ideation studio will provide a kind of digital maker space for students to pursue their projects and develop designs. 

A scholar’s event network will be housed in what was the original front door lobby of Price Gilbert. This will feature a large space for presentations, such as dissertation defense and small meetings, as well as breakout rooms and exhibit space. Finally, a collections showcase will feature unique materials from the Library’s own collections as well as ongoing research at Georgia Tech and materials on loan. 

When complete, the Library Renewal Project is expected to double seating space and reduce energy use by 60 percent. The vision is that the Library and Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons will function as an integrated complex. 

With the opening of the LSC, both Emory and Georgia Tech will immediately benefit from increased access to each other’s collections. Eventually, the goal is for both to have full access to the other’s collections, both in the LSC and on each others’ main campuses. The collaboration is ideal for both sides, as the collections only overlap by about 17 percent. 

“Libraries began as places to talk, think, and motivate each other,” Bras said. “To an extent, it feels like we’re coming full circle.”

Presentation materials from both town halls are available at www.provost.gatech.edu

Location

Atlanta, GA

Contact

Kristen Bailey
Institute Communications

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Commission Surveys What’s Next in Higher Ed

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The higher education landscape is changing quickly. Georgia Tech has been at the forefront of some of that change, including online learning and classroom methodology. Last fall, Rafael L. Bras, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, appointed a commission that will help keep Tech at the forefront of education innovation.

The goals of the Commission on Creating the Next in Education include exploration of new ideas in content delivery and nurturing a culture of lifelong learning for undergraduate, graduate, and professional education learners. 

“If we are to continue to live up to our vision of defining the 21st century technological research university, then we must be nimble and lead in creating and adapting new pedagogy and technology,” Bras said. “That will make Georgia Tech and our learners the very best and an example for all.”

The 40-member education commission is co-chaired by Bonnie Ferri, associate chair for undergraduate affairs in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Rich DeMillo, executive director, Center for 21st Century Universities (C21U). Under their direction, the commission will meet over the next 18 months. Through discovery, ideation, and design phases, the members will take a look at the Institute’s current methodologies and benchmark best practices in higher education, including issues of delivery and accessibility. Ultimately, the commission will recommend pilots and projects that will move Georgia Tech towards the optimal educational enterprise for a leading technological research university of the 21st century. 

“This commission brings together a group of Georgia Tech individuals from across disciplines and educational perspectives,” Ferri said. “That approach allows for innovative ideas that span interdisciplinary, co-curricular, and design perspectives that we know will bring new, innovative ideas about the educational landscape at Georgia Tech.” 

The commission discovery groups will explore future learning needs, demographics and populations, peer institutions, partners and competitors, societal and economic influences, and future pedagogy considerations. Throughout the 18-month period, activities and events for the campus community will include town halls, featured speakers, surveys, and focus groups. 

“As an institution, we find ourselves with an exciting opportunity as the traditions of higher education are quickly rewritten, both philosophically and pedagogically,” said DeMillo. “Georgia Tech is well positioned to be a leader among our peers and define what innovation truly means to the educational experience.” 

Along with the co-chairs, Georgia Tech President Emeritus G. Wayne Clough and C21U visiting scholar Jeff Selingo will serve as advisors for the commission. 

The commission was first suggested at an October 2015 town hall on Georgia Tech’s Educational Innovation Ecosystem — an environment defined by the efforts of C21U, the Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning, Georgia Tech Professional Education, and the Office of Information Technology.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Contact

Susie Ivy
Institute Communications

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Inaugural Emerging Leaders Program Participants Selected for Fall 2016

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16 faculty members to participate in nine-month program of leadership activities

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leadership
Eric Vigoda

This fall, the Office of the Provost is partnering with the Institute for Leadership and Entrepreneurship (ILE) and the Office of Graduate Education and Faculty Development to host the first cohort of the Emerging Leaders Program.

In May, interested individuals were invited to either self-nominate or nominate a colleague. Of the 62 applications received for the 2016–17 program year, Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Rafael L. Bras, in consultation with an advisory committee, chose 16 participants, ensuring institutional level perspective and a balanced representation across Colleges and Schools and across associate and full professors. The field of candidates has all attained tenure.

"Fostering and mentoring the qualities of good leadership is essential for our goal of institutional effectiveness and providing good stewardship of the present and future of the Institute,” said Bras. "Georgia Tech has an extraordinary pool of talented individuals that are willing and actively seek opportunities to lead. This new program will help those individuals achieve the most of their potential, and contribute to develop a pool of future academic leaders that will serve us and the broader national academic community well."

Beginning in September, the nine-month program will include monthly workshops, as well as a weekend workshop in late October. Other program activities will include small group work, self assessments, and 360-degree assessments. 

"The design of the program is to foster, mentor, and create a leadership climate among all stakeholders at Tech,” said Terry Blum, director of ILE. “The workshops will allow for intensive discussions and sharing of experiences, and will serve to spotlight leadership opportunities for individuals who are interested in being change agents for our larger community."

Due to the high number of applications, many candidates were invited to apply to future planned cohorts. Nominations for the next cohort will begin in Spring 2017.  

"We are very proud of the quality of applicants for the program in its first year,” said Susan Cozzens, vice provost for Graduate Education and Faculty Development. "Having so many good people step up is tremendously encouraging for the future of leadership here at Georgia Tech."

Members of the 2016-2017 cohort:

College of Computing

  • Beki Grinter, professor, Interactive Computing
  • Eric Vigoda, professor, Computer Science

College of Design

  • Jason Freeman, professor, Music

College of Engineering

  • Stephen Ruffin, professor, Aerospace Engineering
  • Christopher Jones, professor, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  • Krista Walton, professor, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  • Joe Le Doux, associate professor, Biomedical Engineering
  • Susan Burns, professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts 

  • Roberta Berry, associate professor, Public Policy
  • Anne Pollock, associate professor, Literature, Media, and Communication
  • Adam Stulberg, professor, International Affairs

College of Sciences

  • Deirdre Shoemaker, professor, Physics
  • Jenny Singleton, professor, Psychology
  • Joseph Dufek, associate professor, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

Scheller College of Business

  • Han Zhang, associate professor, Information Technology Management
  • Nishant Dass, associate professor, Finance

For more information, visit http://www.provost.gatech.edu/emerging-leaders

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

susie.ivy@comm.gatech.edu

Contact

Susie Ivy

Institute Communications

404-385-3782

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Task Force Recommends Changes to Classroom and Academic Scheduling Processes

Subtitle

Changes Would Set New Policies and Planning Principles, Enable New Technology, and Centralize Classroom-Scheduling Function

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The Task Force on Classroom and Academic Scheduling recently released its final report and five recommendations that will assist students in planning their academic careers, better utilize campus resources, and increase coordination of the classroom-scheduling function among academic and administrative units.

Commissioned by senior Institute leadership in October 2015, the task force was co-chaired by Joe Hughes, professor, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Steven Girardot, associate vice provost for Undergraduate Education. It also included faculty from all six colleges, students, and administrators who are involved in class scheduling. It was charged to conduct a comprehensive review of Georgia Tech's classroom- and academic-scheduling processes and protocols to determine a path forward that balances the needs of Georgia Tech students and faculty with existing campus resources — namely instructional space. The task force built on the work of the Academic Calendar Task Force, which completed its report and recommendations in Spring 2015.  

“The Task Force on Classroom and Academic Scheduling was the next logical step following the phased changes to the academic calendar over the past year,” said Rafael Bras, provost and executive vice president for Academic Affairs. “Education and learning experiences are changing fast. Our student population is larger and also changing quickly. The future will only bring more challenges and demands on our facilities as we seek to provide the best education to all our students. Our approach to academic scheduling must embrace a common-good approach to serve the needs of our community as a whole.”

Data gathering and feedback activities among faculty, staff, and students included extensive listening sessions and focus groups across campus, results from recent surveys, a literature review and benchmark data from other institutions, and current space-utilization and course-enrollment reports. The task force found that current scheduling practices place considerable burden on the Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. period and take little advantage of the remainder of the day, creating unused campus capacity and inefficiencies in space utilization. Many students, particularly undergraduates, expressed concerns about frequent schedule conflicts and a perceived lack of available classes, which may ultimately impact their ability to complete their degree requirements in a timely manner. Faculty, staff, and students alike expressed interest in technology-supported scheduling practices that are family-friendly and support work-life balance.

“The feedback process was vital and involved dozens of members of our Georgia Tech community,” said Hughes. “We heard about current pain points for students navigating the path to graduation and the importance of schedules that support the varying needs of our faculty, staff, and students outside of the classroom. Building on the work of previous task forces and on new data, our recommendations and a set of Guiding Principles have been designed to get at the core of those issues and lead to sustainable processes that will accommodate the Institute’s growing enrollment and other future demands.”

The complete task force recommendations are:

  1. Adopt a new daily classroom-scheduling template and associated policies that define allowable times for scheduling of individual courses, incorporating 15-minute breaks between classes.
  2. Develop policies and procedures that include the establishment of “anchor classes,” and best practices for scheduling and registration in Banner.
  3. Establish a permanent joint subcommittee of the Institute Graduate Curriculum Committee (IGCC) and the Institute Undergraduate Curriculum Committee (IUCC) to act on matters related to class and instructional scheduling.
  4. Merge the academic class-scheduling functions performed by the Registrar’s office and class-scheduling functions performed by Capital Planning and Space Management, and centralize both functions in the Registrar’s office.
  5. After a technology audit, make recommendations for strategic investments in technology that support class scheduling, registration, and related analytics.

“Adoption of the task force’s recommendations allows Georgia Tech to be an effective steward of taxpayer resources and best utilize our campus space,” said Steve Swant, executive vice president for Administration and Finance. “Moving forward, the realignment of the scheduling function and new policies will streamline administrative functions and improve overall institutional effectiveness.”

Although students and faculty are directly affected by scheduling decisions, the processes are not widely known or understood. “There is no ‘perfect’ schedule that matches everyone’s preferences,” said Hughes. “However, by focusing on common goals and working cooperatively, we believe that the current situation can be significantly improved for the Institute community.”

Recommendations are slated to be phased in starting during the next academic term, but will not impact registration and scheduling for Spring 2017. Campuswide town halls, along with focused faculty/staff information sessions, are planned during the coming weeks. (See below for details.)

Additional Information:

Town Hall Presentations (open to campus):

  • Tuesday, Oct. 25, 3 p.m. — Student Center Theater
  • Thursday, Nov. 3, 11 a.m. — East Architecture Building, Room 123 (auditorium)

Invitation-Only Sessions:

  • Monday, Oct. 17 — Academic Associate Deans Meeting
  • Wednesday, Oct. 19 — Deans and Vice Provosts Meeting
  • Tuesday, Nov. 15 — Faculty Senate
  • Wednesday, Nov. 16 — GTAAN
  • TBD — Classroom Schedulers (being organized by the Registrar’s Office)

 

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

steven.girardot@gatech.edu

Contact

Steven Girardot, Associate Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education

Joe Hughes, Professor, School of Electrical & Computer Engineering

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Institute to Sponsor OpenIDEO Higher Ed Challenge with U.S. Dept. of Education

Subtitle

Global design challenge seeks to explore the future of colleges and universities

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Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons (CULC) (Photo Credit: Raftermen Photography)

Georgia Tech and IDEO, an international design and consulting firm, are partnering to sponsor and participate in the OpenIDEO Future of Higher Education Challenge. The global initiative was announced Nov. 15 at the White House by Department of Education Under Secretary Ted Mitchell and will run through February 2017.

According to IDEO, the OpenIDEO Challenge seeks to find solutions to “...reimagine how we prepare students — of all ages — for active civic engagement, real-world employment and career success in an ever transforming society.” It will provide faculty, staff and students with the opportunity to submit their ideas on how both Georgia Tech and the global higher education community can innovate and meet the challenges of tomorrow. On campus, Provost Rafael L. Bras and his Commission on Creating the Next in Education (CNE) will lead the Challenge.

“The Challenge is an exciting complement to the CNE as it strives to develop bold ideas that will transform the educational experience of the next generation of Georgia Tech learners,” said Bras, who is also executive vice president for Academic Affairs and the K. Harrison Brown Family Chair. “It’s a great way to harness the creative and innovative minds of our own Georgia Tech community as well as those of our partners, innovators in higher education and other stakeholders.”

OpenIDEO is a branch of IDEO that utilizes human-centered and collaborative design thinking to solve the world’s toughest problems.

The Challenge’s Research Phase is now underway. The global higher education community is called to share stories and reflections, emotions, perspectives and other personal contributions related to education after high school and throughout one’s lifetime. These contributions can be shared through the OpenIDEO Challenge Portal.

A solutions-driven Ideas Phase and then a Refinement Phase — in which Georgia Tech, other challenge sponsors, and an Advisory Panel will create a short list of submitted ideas for a final presentation during the Top Ideas Phase — will follow this phase. Once these ideas are finalized in February, Georgia Tech will host a summit to explore the concepts and find ways to turn collaborative ideas into real world solutions.

Other OpenIDEO Challenge sponsors include ASU GSV Summit, Level Education from Northeastern University, USA Funds and the U.S. Department of Education.

“American college students are more diverse than ever before. The ‘new normal’ student may be a 24-year-old returning veteran, a 36-year-old single mother, a part-time student juggling work and college, or a first-generation college student. While America has some of the best colleges and universities in the world, we need to better support these students and all students. To do so we simply must innovate. I’m excited to see the ideas that this challenge will spark,” said U.S. Education Under Secretary Ted Mitchell.

The Atlanta chapter of OpenIDEO, which recently completed a project to bring human-centered design to students, maintains an active relationship with Georgia Tech students. Through the OpenIDEO Challenge, Georgia Tech hopes to stimulate the world’s best out-of-the-box design thinking about the future of global postsecondary education as it seeks to define the technological university of the 21st century. For more information about the Challenge, visit the provost’s CNE website or Georgia Tech’s Center for 21st Century Universities (C21U) website.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

maderer@gatech.edu

Contact

Jason Maderer
National Media Relations
404-660-2926
maderer@gatech.edu

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Cozzens to Retire After 19 Years at Tech

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Her sense of equity and fairness — this is a quality that immediately comes to mind when former students and colleagues alike are asked what Susan Cozzens’ greatest contribution to Georgia Tech has been. 

“My favorite characteristic of Susan’s is her commitment to fairness,” says Kamau Bobb, a former Ph.D. student who worked with Cozzens and is now a program officer for the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering at the National Science Foundation. “She has been able, across a long career, to keep fairness at the center not just of her person, but at the center of her research agenda. Her research portfolio is not pursuing knowledge for knowledge sake, but in the service of fairness.” 

After 19 years of service to Tech, Cozzens, vice provost for Graduate Education and Faculty Development (VPGEFD), will retire on June 30. She has been awarded Professor Emerita of Public Policy.  

“I’m really looking forward to going back to just research and writing,” Cozzens said. “My field is innovation studies, and it seems like a good moment to focus in on studying how innovation in affluent economies can produce good jobs for individuals.” 

Cozzens started her career at Tech as chair of Public Policy, which she points out is “the best science and technology policy program in the country.” In 2012, Rafael L. Bras, provost and executive vice president for Academic Affairs, selected Cozzens to be Tech’s first VPGEFD. 

“Susan was a proven advocate and steady voice for faculty and graduate students long before she became the vice provost,” Bras said. “As a long-time member of the faculty and doctoral student advisor, she understood their unique concerns and saw the great potential for growth in graduate education. She has also always been steadfast in her commitment to fairness and diversity. Those qualities made her the best fit for the vice provost role — and she has done a phenomenal job.”

Leslie N. Sharp, associate vice provost for Graduate Education and Faculty Development, first crossed paths with Cozzens in 1999, when she was a doctoral student.

“I don’t think I could have asked for a better mentor to work with over the last several years,” Sharp said. “I have so many memories of Susan going out of her way to stand up for what’s right and fair. She constantly inspires me to be the same way in my own life.” 

Paul Goldbart, dean of the College of Sciences, has always appreciated Cozzens’ commitment to both faculty and and graduate students, and her recognition that postdocs are more likely to thrive in a community of peers.

“I’ve also benefited from her encouragement,” he said. “She has heard many of my attempts to explain — using everyday language — the marvelous research accomplishments of our scientists and mathematicians. She has often told me how much she appreciates these vignettes, and I thank her for that!”

When it comes to what Cozzens has enjoyed most during her time at Tech, she mentions the leadership teams she’s been part of, working with two deans, Bras, and President G.P. “Bud” Peterson, and having an impact on graduate students. 

“My favorite memories are of putting all of the hoods on my Ph.D. students,” she said. “I love the hooding ceremony so much.” 

By the end of the year, Cozzens and her husband plan to relocate to the Seattle area to be closer to their daughter, son-in-law, and four grandchildren. 

“I’m going to miss everyone on campus very much,” Cozzens said. “So, please friend me on Facebook, so we can share updates — especially since I’ll finally have time to share my own after June 30.”

Sidebar

<p><em>An internal search is underway for the next vice provost for Graduate Education and Faculty Development. For more information, visit </em><a href="http://provost.gatech.edu/VPGEFD-search"><strong>provost.gatech.edu/VPG…;

Location

Atlanta, GA

Contact

Amelia Pavlik
Graduate Education and Faculty Development

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