Raychowdhury Wins IEEE/ACM Innovator Under 40 Award

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Associate Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology

Arijit Raychowdhury received the 2018 IEEE/ACM "Innovator Under 40 Award" at the Design Automation Conference, held June 24-28 in San Francisco, California. He is the ON Semiconductor Junior Professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

The award is intended for specific contributions such as commercial products, software or hardware systems, or specific algorithms or tools incorporated into other systems widely used by industry and academia. The impact is measured by commercialization and wide adoption of the nominee’s contributions.

Raychowdhury won the award for his contributions to "integrated DSL modems, always-on and intelligent sensor hardware and model development for non-linear control in voltage regulators.”

Prior to attending graduate school, Raychowdhury first worked as an analog researcher at Texas Instruments (TI) for two years, where he designed the world's first adaptive mixed-signal echo-canceller for the receive-channel in ADSL modems. It used a hardware based optimizer for impedance matching and resulted in 1.5X range improvement. Raychowdhury holds two key patents in this area, and the design eventually was adopted by three generations of TI modems and was awarded the EDN design of the year award.

After receiving his Ph.D., Raychowdhury joined Intel Labs as a research scientist where he led the design of "always-on" smart microphones, which led to a design win with BMW and led to the adoption of the technology in automotive infotainment systems. This was the industry's first hardware design that incorporated an ultra-low power microphone-sensor front-end with a fully-programmable keyword-spotting hardware.

Since joining Georgia Tech in 2013, Raychowdhury has been exploring various aspects of power-efficient design. Most notably, his students and he contributed to the development of switched-mode and non-linear control in high-bandwidth all-digital, linear regulators that have gained wide traction with the semiconductor companies. The design principles have been adopted in internal test-chips and system prototypes at Qualcomm and Intel.

Raychowdhury was nominated for this IEEE/ACM award by researchers and engineers from Qualcomm, TI, TSMC, and Intel with support from Georgia Tech and the University of California, Berkeley.

Nasir, Raychowdhury Selected for Top Pick Paper in Hardware and Embedded Security

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Saad Bin Nasir

A paper coauthored by Saad Bin Nasir and Arijit Raychowdhury has been selected as a “Top Pick Paper in Hardware and Embedded Security.” Both of them are affiliated with the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE); Nasir is a recent ECE Ph.D. graduate and Raychowdhury is a professor in the School and served as Nasir’s advisor.  

The “top picks” in hardware security represent the top 10 most impactful papers that have been published in the area in the last six years, from 2013 to 2018. Top pick papers span a gamut of topics in hardware, microarchitecture, and embedded security from leading conferences. They are selected from conference and journal papers that have appeared in leading hardware security conferences, including but not limited to DAC, DATE, ICCAD, HOST, VLSI Design, CHES, ETS, VTS, ITC, IEEE S&P, Euro S&P, Usenix Security, ASIA CCS, NDSS, ISCA, HASP, MICRO, ASPLOS, HPCA, ACSAC, and ACM CCS. 

Nasir’s top-pick paper is titled “High Efficiency Power Side-Channel Attack Immunity using Noise Injection in Attenuated Signature Domain” and had previously won the best paper award in the IEEE International Symposium on Hardware Oriented Security and Trust (HOST) in 2017. This paper proposed a novel power management technique that reduces side channel leakage in cryptographic engines. The work was done in collaboration with researchers from Purdue University and continues to have a significant impact in the community. Parts of the design have been adopted by Intel and Qualcomm as a part of their hardware-security roadmap. 

Nasir graduated with his Ph.D. in December 2017 while working in the Integrated Circuits and Systems Research Lab under the advisement of Raychowdhury. Nasir is currently a researcher in Qualcomm’s Corporate Research Division in San Diego, California.

Raychowdhury Selected for 2020 Qualcomm Faculty Award

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Associate Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology

Arijit Raychowdhury has been selected for the 2020 Qualcomm Faculty Award (QFA) for his contributions to low-power system-on-a-chip (SoC) design, including his group’s work on power-management and clocking circuits that have impacted Qualcomm’s internal research and development. 

The QFA supports key professors and their research, with the goal of strengthening Qualcomm’s engagement with faculty who also play a key role in Qualcomm’s recruiting of top graduate students.

Fine-grain power-management plays a critical role in improving the energy-efficiency of low-power SoCs and requires a close-loop control between system software and embedded hardware. Over the last five-plus years, Raychowdhury’s group has pioneered novel control topologies for improving the integration and performance of embedded voltage regulators, and his students have obtained multiple Best Paper Awards and scholarships based on their work. 

Their research has also led to multiple papers in premier venues — such as the International Solid-State Circuits Conference, the VLSI Symposium, and the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits – as well joint technology development with several semiconductor companies, including Qualcomm. In particular, Raychowdhury’s group proposed a new circuit concept – co-regulation of clock and power-supply in a single control loop – that is currently being prototyped and evaluated by Qualcomm’s Processor Research Group.

Raychowdhury is a professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), where he leads the Integrated Circuits and Systems Research Lab. Before joining ECE in 2013, Raychowdhury was a staff scientist at Intel’s Circuit Research Lab. His research interests include digital and mixed-signal designs with applications in microprocessors, SoCs, AI accelerators, and power-management integrated circuits.

Wang Receives 2020 Qualcomm Faculty Award

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Hua Wang has been selected for the 2020 Qualcomm Faculty Award (QFA) for his contributions to wideband energy-efficient radio-frequency (RF)/mm-Wave circuits and novel wireless transceiver system architectures that have widely impacted the research and development in the commercial sector of the semiconductor industry. 

The QFA supports key professors and their research, with the goal of strengthening Qualcomm’s engagement with faculty who also play a key role in Qualcomm’s recruiting of top graduate students.

There is a rapidly growing need for high-performance RF/mm-Wave front-end circuits and transceiver systems to address the numerous 5G and Beyond 5G wireless communications and sensing applications. Wang's research group has pioneered a variety of novel circuit topologies and system architectures that are agnostic to process technology platforms and can radically improve the bandwidth, energy-efficiency, and robustness of RF/mm-Wave circuits and systems. Wang's research has led to multiple papers in premier venues, including the International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) and the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits (JSSC).

An associate professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), Wang leads the Georgia Tech Electronics and Micro-Systems (GEMS) Lab. His research interests include innovating analog, RF, and mm-Wave integrated circuits and hybrid systems for wireless communications, sensing, and bioelectronics applications.

Wang is also the recipient of the 2020 DARPA Director's Fellowship, 2018 DARPA Young Faculty Award, 2017 IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society Outstanding Young Engineer Award, and 2015 National Science Foundation CAREER Award. He held the Georgia Tech ECE Demetrius T. Paris Professorship from 2014 to 2018. 

Wang has authored or co-authored over 170 peer-reviewed journal and conference papers. His GEMS research group has won multiple academic awards and best paper awards, including the 2019 Marconi Society Paul Baran Young Scholar, the IEEE Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits (RFIC) Symposium Best Student Paper Awards (2014, 2016, and 2018), the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference (CICC) Outstanding Student Paper Awards (2015, 2018, and 2019), the IEEE CICC Best Conference Paper Award (2017), the 2016 IEEE Microwave Magazine Best Paper Award, and the IEEE SENSORS Best Live Demo Award (2016).

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