Four Georgia Tech Faculty Named IEEE Fellows

Dateline

Images

Jaydev Desai
Four Georgia Tech faculty members were named IEEE Fellows, effective January 1, 2018. They are Jaydev Desai, a professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME); Saibal Mukhopadhyay and Justin Romberg, both professors in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE); and Kevin James “Jim” Sangston, a senior research engineer in the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI).
Saibal Mukhopadhyay has been an assistant professor in ECE since 2007.
Kevin James "Jim" Sangston

Four Georgia Tech faculty members were named IEEE Fellows, effective January 1, 2018. They are Jaydev Desai, a professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME); Saibal Mukhopadhyay and Justin Romberg, both professors in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE); and Kevin James “Jim” Sangston, a senior research engineer in the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI).

The IEEE Grade of Fellow is conferred by the IEEE Board of Directors upon a person with an outstanding record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. IEEE Fellow is the highest grade of membership and is recognized by the technical community as a prestigious honor and an important career achievement.

Desai is being recognized “for contributions to medical and swarm robotics.” A BME faculty member since 2016, he also serves as associate director of the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines and as director of the newly launched Georgia Center for Medical Robotics. Desai’s research interests are primarily in image-guided surgical robotics, cancer diagnosis at the micro-scale, and rehabilitation robotics. Before joining Georgia Tech, Desai was a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Mukhopadhyay is being recognized “for contributions to energy-efficient and robust computing systems design.” An ECE faculty member since 2007, he leads the Gigascale Reliable Energy Efficient Nanosystem (GREEN) Lab, where he and his current team of 12 Ph.D. students develop smart machines that are able to generate usable information from real-time data for diverse applications - from self-powered sensors to mobile phones to high-performance servers. Mukhopadhyay’s team explores algorithmic principles to make these systems energy-efficient, robust, and secure, and pursue their experimental demonstration in silicon. 

Romberg is being recognized “for contributions to compressive sensing.” An ECE faculty member since 2006, he is the School’s associate chair for Research and holds the Schlumberger Professorship. In addition, Romberg serves as associate director for the Center for Machine Learning. He conducts research that is on the interface between signal processing, applied harmonic analysis, and optimization. Romberg and his current team of six Ph.D. students are interested in both the mathematical theory and real-world implementation of algorithms to make difficult processing tasks much easier.

Sangston is being recognized “for contributions to coherent detection of radar signals in clutter.” He initially came to GTRI from the U.S Naval Research Laboratory in 1996. His research in target detection in difficult clutter environments from the mid-1990s up till the present time has been a fruitful source of ideas and motivation for many investigators pursuing advanced research on radar target detection problems throughout the world. He currently works in the Sensors and Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory (SEAL), where he conducts research that seeks to combine advanced geometric and algebraic ideas to solve challenging radar signal processing problems. 

The IEEE is the world’s leading professional association for advancing technology for humanity. Through its 400,000-plus members in 160 countries, the association is a leading authority on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power, and consumer electronics.

Dedicated to the advancement of technology, the IEEE publishes 30 percent of the world’s literature in the electrical and electronics engineering and computer science fields, and has developed more than 1,300 active industry standards.  The association also sponsors or co-sponsors nearly 1,700 international technical conferences each year.  To learn more about IEEE or the IEEE Fellow Program, please visit www.ieee.org.

Coogan Receives NSF CAREER Award

Dateline

Images

Sam Coogan

Sam Coogan has received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award for his research project entitled “Correct-By-Design Control of Traffic Flow Networks.”

Coogan is an assistant professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and holds a joint appointment in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. He joined Georgia Tech in August 2017 after serving as an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Today's cities accommodate more people than ever before, leading to transportation networks that operate at or near capacity. In addition, the next generation of transportation systems will include connected vehicles, connected infrastructure, and increased automation, and these advances must coexist with legacy technology into the foreseeable future. Accommodating these rapidly developing advancements requires smarter and more efficient use of existing infrastructure with guarantees of performance, safety, and interoperability.

The goal of Coogan’s project is to develop fundamental theory and domain-driven techniques for controlling traffic flow in large-scale transportation networks. Recent advances in inexpensive sensors, wireless technology, and the Internet of Things (IoT) enable real-time connectivity of vehicles and infrastructure that offers abundant data and unprecedented opportunities for efficient and optimized transportation systems.

The main technical goal of the project is to develop techniques and algorithms that are correct-by-design, ensuring that these transportation systems satisfy required operating specifications. In pursuit of this goal, the project will first develop models of traffic flow from rich data streams and then will leverage these models to enable scalable control approaches.

In addition, this project will integrate a forward-looking education plan that will introduce a Control Grand Challenge design competition in the introductory course in control theory for undergraduates. For this competition, students will design a controller for an autonomous, scale-model car and then compete with their design.

Coogan Tapped for AFOSR Young Investigator Award

Dateline

Images

Sam Coogan

Sam Coogan has been chosen for an Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Award for his research project entitled "Scalable Analysis and Control of Dynamic Flow Networks.” Coogan is an assistant professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

Coogan’s project will develop fundamental theory for controlling and designing networks that model the flow of physical material among interconnected components. These systems are called physical flow networks and are used to model, for example, vehicular transportation networks, air traffic networks, and civil infrastructure. The fundamental commonalities of such flow networks suggest a unified approach for modeling, while domain-specific features point towards a full understanding of their rich behavior. 

In physical flow networks, nonlinearities in each component compound due to the network interactions. For example, congestion in one link of a road network can impact traffic flow in other parts of the network over time. In applications, such networks are becoming larger, more complex, and increasingly distributed, and there is an urgent need to study the mathematical models that underlie many of these systems. The proposed research will focus on using and extending tools from nonlinear system analysis to study and control these physical flow networks.

Coogan holds a joint faculty appointment with Georgia Tech’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Prior to joining Georgia Tech in 2017, he was an assistant professor in the Electrical Engineering Department at the University of California, Los Angeles from 2015-2017. 

In January 2018, Coogan received an NSF CAREER Award to study the control of traffic networks with an emphasis on autonomy, and in December 2017, he received the IEEE Transactions on Control of Network Systems Best Paper Award at the 56th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control. 

Coogan Named as Demetrius T. Paris Junior Professor

Dateline

Images

Sam Coogan has been appointed to the Demetrius T. Paris Junior Professorship, effective December 1, 2018. A professorship for untenured faculty members in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), this position was previously held by Hua Wang. 

Coogan joined the ECE faculty in July 2017 after two years on the faculty at UCLA. He is a member of the systems and controls technical interest group and holds a joint appointment in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. 

Coogan’s research is in dynamical systems and autonomy and focuses on developing scalable tools for verification and control of networked, cyber-physical systems. He and his team of nine graduate students are interested in applying these tools to create efficient, intelligent, and autonomous transportation systems. He is a member of the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines and the Supply Chain and Logistics Institute. 

Coogan received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Georgia Tech and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Before joining Tech as a faculty member, he was an assistant professor in the Electrical Engineering Department at UCLA from 2015-2017.

Coogan has published almost 40 refereed journal and conference papers. Since arriving at Tech last year, he has won a National Science Foundation CAREER Award and an Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Award. Coogan also received the IEEE Transactions on Control of Network Systems Outstanding Paper Award in 2017.

Egerstedt Elected to Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences

Dateline

Images

Magnus Egerstedt

Magnus Egerstedt has been elected as a Foreign Member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences. Egerstedt is being honored for his work on multi-robot systems and for his previous role as the executive director for the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (IRIM) at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He and his fellow honorees will be recognized at an official ceremony on October 25, 2019 in Stockholm, Sweden. 

The Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA) is an independent academy whose mission is “…to promote the engineering and economic sciences and the advancement of business and industry for the benefit of society.” IVA has 1,300 elected Swedish and international members. They are decision-makers, experts, and researchers from the private sector, academia, and public administration. King Carl XVI Gustaf is the patron of the organization and participates in IVA’s activities.

Egerstedt is the Steve W. Chaddick School Chair of the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at Georgia Tech, and he has been a member of the ECE faculty since 2001. He holds secondary appointments in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, the School of Interactive Computing, and the Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering.

Egerstedt is a Fellow of the IEEE, and has received numerous teaching and research awards, including the Ragazzini Award from the American Automatic Control Council, the Outstanding Doctoral Advisor Award and the Eta Kappa Nu Outstanding Teacher Award from Georgia Tech, and the Alumni of the Year Award from the KTH Royal Institute of Technology.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Ansari Selected for Inaugural Sutterfield Family Early Career Professorship

Dateline

Images

Azadeh Ansari

Azadeh Ansari has been appointed to the Sutterfield Family Early Career Professorship in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), effective September 1, 2019. 

Ansari joined the ECE faculty in August 2017 after working as a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Physics at Caltech. She is a member of the nanotechnology and the electronic design and applications technical interest groups. Ansari currently advises six graduate students who work in the fields of nano/microelectromechanical systems (N/MEMS), nonlinear mechanical frequency combs, radio frequency acoustic devices, and micro-robotics.

Ansari received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Sharif University of Technology (Tehran, Iran) in 2010 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 2013 and 2016, respectively. She was the recipient of the 2016 Rackham Distinguished Dissertation Award at the University of Michigan for her Ph.D. work on "Gallium Nitride Integrated Micro-systems for RF Applications.”

Ansari has published over 30 refereed journal and conference papers and has one published patent and three patent applications. She was a Center for Teaching and Learning Class of 1969 teaching fellow in Spring 2019. Ansari is the director of the Center for Muscle-Inspired Actuators for Multi-scale Robotics, an Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology-funded center for multi-disciplinary research. 

Her team’s development of micro-bristle-bots and their potential uses for treating medical conditions, manipulating materials, or sensing environmental changes have recently received much attention in the technical and popular press, including NBC News. The story can be read on Georgia Tech’s research news page.

Ansari Tapped for NSF CAREER Award

Dateline

Images

Azadeh Ansari

Azadeh Ansari has been named as a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award. Ansari holds the Sutterfield Family Junior Professorship in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

The title of her award is "Radio Frequency Spectrum Sensing with a Fine-Tooth Nanomechanical Comb,” and it will start on March 1, 2020 and end on February 28, 2025. The tremendous growth of wireless devices and Internet of Things (IoT) applications has placed a great strain on the radio frequency (RF) network infrastructures, congesting the channels and overcrowding the radio frequency spectrum. 

Battery-operated smart devices, such as smartphones, wearable technologies such as smartwatches and glasses, autonomous machines, personal radars, and other smart gadgets, all compete for bandwidth and require efficient spectrum utilization. To combat the looming RF scarcity, a chip-scale, tunable multi-GHz nano-mechanical frequency comb generator is proposed that utilizes the parallelism resulting from the multiplicity of the comb teeth to perform RF spectrum sensing in a fraction of the time, in a smaller form factor, using lower power, and with far fewer circuit components than the current state-of-the-art hardware solutions.

Ansari joined the ECE faculty in August 2017 after working as a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Physics at Caltech. She is a member of the nanotechnology and the electronic design and applications technical interest groups. Her research interests are in nano/microelectromechanical systems (N/MEMS), nonlinear mechanical frequency combs, radio frequency acoustic devices, and micro-robotics.

Ansari has published over 30 refereed journal and conference papers and has one published patent and three patent applications. She was a Center for Teaching and Learning Class of 1969 teaching fellow in Spring 2019. Ansari is the director of the Center for Muscle-Inspired Actuators for Multi-scale Robotics, an Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology-funded center for multi-disciplinary research.

Coogan Selected for ACC Donald P. Eckman Award

Dateline

Images

Sam Coogan received the 2020 Donald P. Eckman Award at the American Control Conference, which was held July 1-3 in an online format. Coogan is the Demetrius T. Paris Junior Professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

The Eckman Award recognizes an outstanding young engineer in the field of automatic control. The recipient must be younger than 35 years on January 1 of the year of award. Contributions may be technical or scientific publications, theses, patents, inventions, or combinations of these items in the field of automatic control made while the nominee was a resident of the USA.

Coogan’s research is in the area of dynamical systems and autonomy and focuses on developing fundamental theory for verification and control of networked and autonomous systems with an emphasis on applications in transportation systems. His recent work has, for example, studied ride-sharing fleets with a mix of autonomous and human-driven vehicles, efficient charging of electric vehicles at shared charging facilities, and algorithms for safe coordination and control of multi-vehicle teams. His work has been supported by a Young Investigator Award from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research in 2018 and a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation in 2018.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Howard Chosen for Walker’s Legacy Power25 Atlanta Awards

Dateline

Images

Dr. Ayanna Howard

Ayanna M. Howard has been named as a recipient of the Walker’s Legacy Power25 Atlanta Awards, which will be presented on October 12 at the WeWork Tower Place in Atlanta.

Howard will be recognized for her achievements as the Linda J. and Mark C. Smith Chair Professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and will be among 25 women from the metro Atlanta area honored for their achievements in technology, media, business, education, and industry. 

The Walker’s Legacy Power25 Atlanta Awards Program is part of a national effort by the organization to highlight the achievements of local business and community leaders. The event is hosted by WeWork, a global company that provides shared workspace, community, and services for entrepreneurs, freelancers, startups, and small businesses. In addition to Atlanta, events will also be held to honor women in Los Angeles, Chicago, Detroit, Houston, and New York this fall.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

College of Computing Selects Ayanna Howard to Lead School of Interactive Computing

Dateline

Images

Ayanna Howard, professor and Linda J. and Mark C. Smith Chair in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) to chair its School of Interactive Computing.

Following a national search, the Georgia Tech College of Computing has selected Ayanna Howard, professor and Linda J. and Mark C. Smith Chair in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) to chair its School of Interactive Computing.

Howard, who is also associate chair for faculty development in ECE, will succeed Professor Annie Antón, who served in the role from 2012-17. Antón finished her five-year term in June 2017 and remains a professor within the school. Professor Amy Bruckman has served as the interim chair since July.

“Ayanna Howard is the perfect individual to lead our School of Interactive Computing, and we are excited to welcome her to the College,” said Zvi Galil, John P. Imlay Jr. Dean of Computing. “She brings a wealth of experience in research and administration, and she has consistently succeeded in leadership opportunities both inside and outside Georgia Tech. Her vision and energy will help ensure that IC will continue to be a national leader in computing research and education.”

As a testimony to her interdisciplinary focus, Howard has collaborated with a number of IC researchers in the past and said the she is looking forward to fostering new – and fruitful –  relationships with the school’s faculty and staff.

“I am thrilled for the opportunity to work with the amazing faculty, staff, and students within the School of Interactive Computing,” Howard said. “They are already national leaders in some of the most important fields of modern computing, and I look forward to building on that foundation and continuing to pursue research and innovation that addresses real challenges facing our world today.”

Howard received her bachelor’s degree in engineering from Brown University, her master’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California, and her Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, in 1999.

Her research is highlighted by her focus on technology development for intelligent agents that must interact with and in a human-centered world. This work, which addresses issues of human-robot interaction, learning, and autonomous control, has resulted in more than 200 peer-reviewed publications. To date, her accomplishments have been highlighted through a number of awards and articles, including highlights in Time, Black Enterprise, and USA Today. She was named an MIT Technology Review top young innovator and recognized as one of the 23 most powerful women engineers in the world by Business Insider.

She has more than 20 years of research and development experience covering a number of projects that have been supported by organizations like the National Science Foundation, Procter and Gamble, NASA, ExxonMobil, Intel, and the Grammy Foundation.

Howard is the director of the Human-Automation Systems Lab (HumAnS), and in 2015 founded a $3 million traineeship initiative in health care robotics. In 2013, she founded Zyrobotics as a university spin-off and holds a position in the company as chief technology officer. Zyrobotics is currently licensing technology derived from her research and has released its first suite of mobile therapy and educational products for children with differing needs.

From 1993-2005, Howard worked at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, where she was a senior robotics researcher and deputy manager in the Office of the Chief Scientist. She has also served as the associate director of research for Georgia Tech’s Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines and as chair of the multidisciplinary robotics Ph.D. program at Georgia Tech.

Howard will assume her new role in January 2018. Her appointment is contingent upon approval by Georgia Tech President G.P. “Bud” Peterson and the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. She will retain her current Linda J. and Mark C. Smith endowment after transitioning to the School of Interactive Computing.

Subscribe to Robotics