Saeedifard Chosen for C3E Technology Research & Innovation Award

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Maryam Saeedifard

Maryam Saeedifard has been named as the recipient of the 2021 U.S. Clean Energy Education and Empowerment (C3E) Technology Research & Innovation Award. Saeedifard holds the Dean’s Professorship in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE). 

She will be presented with this award at the 2021 U.S. C3E Women in Clean Energy Symposium, to be held virtually November 3-4. This awards program recognizes mid-career leadership and achievement and is administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, Stanford University’s Precourt Institute for Energy, the Texas A&M Energy Institute, and the MIT Energy Initiative. 

Saeedifard is being recognized for her expertise on clean/renewable energy conversion and carbon dioxide emissions reduction, based on using advanced power electronics-based energy conversion technologies. During her career, she has developed novel, extremely efficient (greater than 98%) power conversion circuits for low-cost and reliable energy harvesting of large-scale wind and photovoltaic farms. 

Another area on which Saeedifard has focused is the control, expansion, and protection of High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission systems for energy and savings. She has worked to improve transmission resiliency of bulk power transmission of renewable energy resources over long distances. 

Saeedifard’s leadership in IEEE professional societies, IEEE journals, and educational contributions will also be recognized at this event. She has been a member of the Georgia Tech ECE faculty since 2014.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Khan Chosen for DARPA Young Faculty Award

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Asif Khan

Asif Khan has been chosen for a DARPA Young Faculty Award. Khan is an assistant professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), where he has been on the faculty since 2017.

Khan is receiving this award for his research on ferroelectric field-effect transistors for embedded non-volatile memory applications. Ferroelectric field-effect transistors is one of the most-promising device technologies for artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) hardware, due to its energy efficiency and compatibility with high-volume semiconductor manufacturing. The project will focus on solving the critical voltage problem of this device technology, by identifying and implementing new strategies for interface defect reduction in and the downscaling of the ferroelectric gate-dielectric stack. 

Khan works on advanced semiconductor devices that will shape the future of computing in the post-scaling era. His research group currently focuses on ferroelectric devices in all aspects ranging from materials physics, growth, and electron microscopy to device fabrication, all the way to ferroelectric circuits and systems for AI/ML/data-centric applications.

His early career work led to the first experimental proof-of-concept demonstration of a physical phenomenon, namely the negative capacitance, in ferroelectric materials, which can reduce the power dissipation in electronic devices below the “fundamental” thermodynamic limit. Negative capacitance is currently a vibrant research area in materials science, condensed matter physics, and electrical engineering, and it is being pursued by all major semiconductor companies for advanced transistor technologies.

In the past, Khan has received multiple awards, including the NSF CAREER Award (2021), the Intel Rising Star Award (2020), Qualcomm Innovation Fellowship (2012), TSMC Outstanding Student Research Award (2011), and the University Gold Medal from Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (2011). He was also named to the Center for Teaching and Learning Class of 1934 CIOS Honor Roll for his outstanding teaching in ECE8863 Quantum Computing Devices and Hardware in Fall 2020.

Khan’s group currently consists of seven graduate students and two research staff members. They publish in flagship microelectronics conferences, such as the International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) and the Symposium on VLSI Technology, and in journals including IEEE Electron Device LettersIEEE Transactions on Electron DevicesNature ElectronicsNature Materials, and Nano Letters. His students received multiple international and Institute-level awards, including the IEEE EDS Masters Student Fellowship (Prasanna Ravindran, 2020) and the Georgia Tech ECE's Colonel Oscar P. Cleaver Award (Nujhat Tasneem in 2018 and Zheng Wang in 2017) for achieving the highest score on the ECE Ph.D. preliminary examination, which was the criteria for the award up to 2018.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Molzahn Selected for IEEE PES Outstanding Young Engineer Award

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Daniel Molzahn

Daniel Molzahn has been named as the recipient of the 2021 IEEE Power and Energy Society (PES) Outstanding Young Engineer Award. Molzahn will be recognized with this award at the IEEE PES General Meeting, to be held July 25-29 in a virtual format. 

This award is presented to engineers who are 35 years of age or younger for technical and educational achievements and for involvement in local/transnational IEEE PES activities and leadership, professional society activities, and community and humanitarian activities. 

Molzahn has been an assistant professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) since 2019. His research focuses on improving power system reliability and resiliency by developing and analyzing algorithms that help engineers better design and operate power grids. Challenges addressed by his work include power flow nonlinearities, large-scale problems, stochasticity from renewables, and the transition from centralized to distributed paradigms. His major contributions to the field are in power flow nonlinearities, large-scale security-constrained optimal power flow, and distributed optimization. 

Molzahn is a leader for the Power Systems Computation Conference (PSCC). He currently serves as the chair of the technical program committee for the 22nd PSCC to be held in 2022; he was the vice-chair of the technical program committee for the 21st PSCC held in 2020. Molzahn has also been a reviewer and session chair for earlier editions of the PSCC and a member of past technical program committees. He and his colleagues won second place at the U.S. Department of Energy ARPA-E Grid Optimization Challenge in 2020. He was a guest associate editor for special issues of the IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid and the IEEE Journal of Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics

At Georgia Tech, Molzahn is a fellow of the Strategic Energy Institute and the faculty advisor for the Georgia Tech Energy Club. He is also involved in activities with the U.S. National Academy of Engineers (NAE). Molzahn was invited to attend the NAE-organized 2019 German-American Frontiers of Engineering (FOE) Symposium, and he accepted a request to serve on the organizing committee for the 2020 EU-US NAE FOE Symposium, which will now be held in November 2021.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Khan Wins NSF CAREER Award

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Asif Khan

Asif Khan has been named as a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award. He is an assistant professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and also holds a courtesy appointment in the School of Materials Science and Engineering.

The title of Khan’s award is “Antiferroelectric Negative Capacitance Transistors for Ultra-low Power Computing,” and it will start on March 15, 2021 and end on February 28, 2026. 

Today's society is experiencing an unprecedented growth of its digital footprint – be it in the form of uploading a photo on Facebook, live-streaming a teaching module to a massive global audience on YouTube, or commandeering a revolution via Twitter. This convenience of modern computing, however, comes with a steep cost in terms of energy use and environmental impact. Today, the global information infrastructure, such as data centers, emit as much greenhouse gases as that of the state of Nevada or a country, such as The Netherlands or Malaysia, and constitute around 1 percent of world-wide electricity demand. According to scientific estimates, this fraction may increase to a double digit percentage in the next 15-20 years. 

At the core of this predicament lies the fact that the fundamental building blocks of digital hardware – the transistors – have long been overdue for a prime upgrade in terms of their energy efficiencies. The proposed research aims to explore an energy-efficient transistor concept – known as a negative capacitance field-effect transistor, using a new class of materials called antiferroelectric oxides. 

Khan joined the ECE faculty in 2017. His research is on advanced semiconductor devices—devices that will shape the future of computing in the post-scaling era. His research group currently focuses on ferroelectric devices, in all aspects ranging from materials physics, growth, and electron microscopy to device fabrication, all the way to ferroelectric circuits and systems for artificial intelligence/machine learning/data-centric applications. Khan’s Ph.D. work led to the proof-of-concept demonstration of the negative capacitance phenomenon in ferroelectric materials, which can reduce the power dissipation in electronic devices below the ‘fundamental’ thermodynamic limit. This culminated in the initial development of the field of negative capacitance.

Khan has published 2 book chapters and 70 journal and peer-reviewed conference publications, and he has given 20 invited talks and tutorials at premier microelectronics and ferroelectric conferences. Khan currently has one patent pending at Intel. 

Khan’s awards include the NSF CAREER award (2021), Intel Rising Star Award (2020), Qualcomm Innovation Fellowship (2012), TSMC Outstanding Student Research Award (2011), and the University Gold Medal from Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (2011). His group at Georgia Tech consists of six Ph.D. students and three research engineers, many of whom won Institute-level and international awards, including an IEEE Electron Devices Society (EDS) Masters Student Fellowship (2020). Khan’s research is supported by the National Science Foundation, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Semiconductor Research Corporation, and Intel Corporation. 

Khan has also developed a graduate course, ECE 8863A Quantum Computing Devices and Hardware, as a part of the campus wide response to the national prioritization of quantum computing, known as the National Quantum Initiative Act (NQIA) that was signed by the U.S. president in 2018. Khan recently received the Class of 1934 CIOS Honor Roll award for excellence in teaching this course in Fall 2020. 

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

LED Lighting Development Wins 2021 Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

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Nick Holonyak Jr., Isamu Akasaki, M. George Craford, Russell Dupuis, and Shuji Nakamura awarded the world’s most prestigious engineering accolade

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The 2021 QEPrize is awarded for the creation and development of LED lighting, which forms the basis of all solid-state lighting technology. Russell Dupuis, of the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, was recognized with his colleagues Nick Holonyak Jr., Isamu Akasaki, M. George Craford, and Shuji Nakamura, for not only for the global impact of LED and solid-state lighting, but also for the tremendous contribution the LED technology has made, and will continue to make, to reducing energy consumption and addressing climate change.

First awarded in 2013 in the name of Her Majesty The Queen, the QEPrize exists to celebrate ground-breaking innovation in engineering. The 2021 winners were announced on February 2 by Lord Browne of Madingley, Chairman of the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering Foundation. HRH The Princess Royal shared a message of congratulation for the winners.

Solid-state lighting technology has changed how we illuminate our world. It can be found everywhere from sports stadiums, parking garages, inside and outside commercial buildings, homes, digital displays and computer screens and cell phones to hand-held laser pointers, automobile headlights and traffic lights. Today’s high-performance LEDs are used in efficient solid-state lighting products across the world and are contributing to the sustainable development of world economies by reducing energy consumption.  

Visible LEDs are now a global industry predicted to be worth over $108 billion by 2025 through low-cost, high-efficiency lighting. They are playing a crucial role in reducing carbon dioxide emissions, consuming significantly less energy and producing 90% less heat than incandescent lighting, and their large-scale use reduces the energy demand required to cool buildings. For this, they are often referred to as the ‘green revolution’ within lighting.

“Engineering is imperative to solving human problems. All over the world, everyone knows the QEPrize. Most importantly, this is a team prize. I was able to do what I did in the 1980s, because of what had come before. When I was modifying reactors every morning and every afternoon continuously for a year and a half, I never thought it would be so successful." Shuji Nakamura

“This is a really special moment for me. The QEPrize is so prestigious and it is spectacular to receive recognition from The Royal Family. It is a career highlight that is impossible to beat. Engineering is incredible, and I am proud to part of something that has made such a big impact on the world.” George Craford

“It is really something to share in this award with my friends and colleagues – all five of us each played an important role, and this recognition means a lot to me personally. In those early days, when we were working long days and nights hand-building reactors, Nick Holonyak mentored us. He really drew us in and inspired us to be part of the adventure that is engineering.” Russell Dupuis

“This year’s Prize winners have not only helped humanity to achieve a greater degree of mastery over the environment, they have enabled us to do so in a sustainable way. They have created a product which we now take for granted, but which will play a major role in ensuring that humanity can live in harmony with nature for many more centuries to come.” Lord Browne of Madingley, Chair, Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering Foundation

“The impact of this innovation is not to be understated. It makes lighting a lot cheaper and more accessible for emerging economies. For example, LEDs are being used on fishing boats where previously the only option would have been paraffin lamps. They are much cheaper and safer. It is not only an extreme engineering achievement, but a societal impact that has a significant impact on the environment.” Sir Christopher Snowden, Chair of the QEPrize Judging Panel

Dupuis holds the Steve W. Chaddick Endowed Chair in Electro-Optics and is a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology; Nakamura is the Cree Chair in Solid-State Lighting and Displays in the Materials Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara; Craford is a Solid-State Lighting Fellow at Philips Lumileds Lighting Company; Akasaki is a University Professor at Nagoya University and Meijo University (Japan); and Holonyak is the John Bardeen Endowed Chair Emeritus in Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

The winners will be formally honoured at a ceremony later this year; they will receive the £1 million prize and an iconic trophy, designed by the 2021 Create the Trophy winner Hannah Goldsmith, a 20-year-old design student from the United Kingdom.

 

About the 2021 QEPrize

QEPrize celebrates engineering’s visionaries, encouraging engineers to help extend the boundaries of what is possible across all disciplines and applications. It also inspires young minds to consider engineering as a career choice and to help to solve the challenges of the future.

The QEPrize is administered by the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering Foundation and funded by generous support from the following corporate donors: BAE Systems plc, BP plc, GlaxoSmithKline, Hitachi, Ltd., Jaguar Land Rover, National Grid plc, Nissan Motor Corporation, Shell UK Ltd., Siemens UK, Sony, Tata Steel Europe, Tata Consultancy Services, and Toshiba.

The 2021 winners are awarded a total cash prize of £1 million.

Contact

For more information or to request an interview, please contact Edelman at QEPrize@Edelman.com

Georgia Tech/Atlanta media contact: John Toon, 404-894-6986, john.toon@comm.gatech.edu

Yu Appointed as IEEE CASS Distinguished Lecturer

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Shimeng Yu has been named as a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society (CASS) for 2021-2022. Yu is an associate professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

Yu leads the Laboratory for Emerging Devices and Circuits, where he and his team design energy-efficient computing systems based on emerging nanoelectronic devices. An example of his group’s work is the development of hardware accelerators for machine/deep learning with CMOS and beyond CMOS technologies.

The two areas in which Yu will present lectures include:

  • Circuit Design and Silicon Prototypes for Compute-in-Memory for Deep Learning Inference Engine
  • NeuroSim: A Benchmark Framework of Compute-in-Memory Hardware Accelerators from Devices/Circuits to Architectures/Algorithms

Yu has been a member of the ECE faculty since 2018. Prior to joining Georgia Tech, he was on the ECE faculty at Arizona State University for five years. Yu has received numerous awards over the last several years, including the ACM/IEEE Design Automation Conference 40 Under-40 Innovators Award, Semiconductor Research Corporation Young Faculty Award, ACM Special Interest Group on Design Automation Outstanding New Faculty Award, and IEEE Electron Devices Society Early Career Award. 

Yu has been active in IEEE CASS activities, including serving on the technical committee of Nanoelectronics and Gigascale Systems and the review committee of the IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS). He currently serves as the associate editor of the IEEE Journal on Exploratory Solid-State Computational Devices and Circuits (JxCDC). More information on IEEE CASS can be found at https://ieee-cas.org/

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

 

Lambert Named President-Elect of IEEE PES

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Frank Lambert

Frank Lambert has been named president-elect for the IEEE Power and Energy Society (PES). His appointment to this role is effective on January 1, 2018, and he will serve in this capacity through 2019.

Lambert will then serve as the IEEE PES president in 2020-2021 and as its past president in 2022-2023. The IEEE PES provides the world’s largest forum for sharing the latest in technological developments in the electric power industry, for developing standards that guide the development and construction of equipment and systems, and for educating members of the industry and the general public.   

Lambert is a principal research engineer at the Georgia Tech National Electric Energy Testing, Research, and Applications Center (NEETRAC) and the Center for Distributed Energy. After spending the first 22 years of his career working at Georgia Power, Lambert came to Georgia Tech in 1996, where he helped to establish NEETRAC, an electric energy-focused research and testing consortium with over 40 electric utility and manufacturing members.

Lambert’s research interests are in power delivery systems, electric vehicles, sensors and communications systems for smart grid, power flow control, and integration of renewable energy into the grid. He earned bachelor's and master's degrees in electrical engineering, both from Georgia Tech. 

Rincón-Mora Named NAI Fellow

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Gabriel A. Rincon-Mora

Gabriel Alfonso Rincón-Mora, a professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). He is part of the Class of 2017 NAI Fellows, consisting of 155 renowned academic inventors who will be inducted during the Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors. The conference will take place on April 4-6, 2018 in Washington, D.C.

A member of the ECE faculty since 2001, Rincón-Mora is being recognized for his work in energy-harvesting and power-conditioning microchips. He was a design consultant at Texas Instruments from 2001-2003 and director of the Georgia Tech Analog Consortium from 2001-2004. Prior to his tenure on the ECE faculty, Rincón-Mora was adjunct professor at Georgia Tech from 1999-2001, senior design engineer and design team leader at Texas Instruments from 1997-2001, and circuit designer at the same company while he was a Ph.D. student at Georgia Tech from 1994-1996. He earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering at Georgia Tech in 1994 and 1996.

Rincón-Mora currently leads the Georgia Tech Analog, Power, and Energy ICs Lab. He holds 25 U.S. patents and 17 foreign patents – all assigned/licensed. They have been incorporated into portable consumer products like cellular phones, laptops, and tablets since 1994. He has published nine books, four book chapters, and over 170 articles; designed over 26 commercial chips; and delivered over 125 international talks.

Rincón-Mora is a Fellow of the IEEE and a Fellow of the Institution of Engineering and Technology. He was recently named Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society (CASS) for 2018-19, the second time that he has received this honor. He will speak on the topics of energizing and powering microsystems and energy-harvesting power supplies. He also serves as technical program committee co-chair for the IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS), to be held May 26-29, 2019 in Sapporo, Japan.

Rincón-Mora is the recipient of the National Hispanic in Technology Award from the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, the Charles E. Perry Visionary Award from Florida International University, a Commendation Certificate from the Lieutenant Governor of California, the IEEE Service Award from IEEE CASS, the Orgullo Hispano and the Hispanic Heritage awards from Robins Air Force Base, a Certificate of Appreciation from IEEE CASS, and two Thank a Teacher Certificates from Georgia Tech. Georgia Tech has also inducted him into its Council of Outstanding Young Engineering Alumni and Hispanic Business magazine named him one of "The 100 Most Influential Hispanics."

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional accolade bestowed to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society. To learn more about the 2017 class of NAI Fellows, visit the NAI website.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

 

Four Georgia Tech Faculty Named IEEE Fellows

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Jaydev Desai
Four Georgia Tech faculty members were named IEEE Fellows, effective January 1, 2018. They are Jaydev Desai, a professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME); Saibal Mukhopadhyay and Justin Romberg, both professors in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE); and Kevin James “Jim” Sangston, a senior research engineer in the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI).
Saibal Mukhopadhyay has been an assistant professor in ECE since 2007.
Kevin James "Jim" Sangston

Four Georgia Tech faculty members were named IEEE Fellows, effective January 1, 2018. They are Jaydev Desai, a professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME); Saibal Mukhopadhyay and Justin Romberg, both professors in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE); and Kevin James “Jim” Sangston, a senior research engineer in the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI).

The IEEE Grade of Fellow is conferred by the IEEE Board of Directors upon a person with an outstanding record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. IEEE Fellow is the highest grade of membership and is recognized by the technical community as a prestigious honor and an important career achievement.

Desai is being recognized “for contributions to medical and swarm robotics.” A BME faculty member since 2016, he also serves as associate director of the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines and as director of the newly launched Georgia Center for Medical Robotics. Desai’s research interests are primarily in image-guided surgical robotics, cancer diagnosis at the micro-scale, and rehabilitation robotics. Before joining Georgia Tech, Desai was a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Mukhopadhyay is being recognized “for contributions to energy-efficient and robust computing systems design.” An ECE faculty member since 2007, he leads the Gigascale Reliable Energy Efficient Nanosystem (GREEN) Lab, where he and his current team of 12 Ph.D. students develop smart machines that are able to generate usable information from real-time data for diverse applications - from self-powered sensors to mobile phones to high-performance servers. Mukhopadhyay’s team explores algorithmic principles to make these systems energy-efficient, robust, and secure, and pursue their experimental demonstration in silicon. 

Romberg is being recognized “for contributions to compressive sensing.” An ECE faculty member since 2006, he is the School’s associate chair for Research and holds the Schlumberger Professorship. In addition, Romberg serves as associate director for the Center for Machine Learning. He conducts research that is on the interface between signal processing, applied harmonic analysis, and optimization. Romberg and his current team of six Ph.D. students are interested in both the mathematical theory and real-world implementation of algorithms to make difficult processing tasks much easier.

Sangston is being recognized “for contributions to coherent detection of radar signals in clutter.” He initially came to GTRI from the U.S Naval Research Laboratory in 1996. His research in target detection in difficult clutter environments from the mid-1990s up till the present time has been a fruitful source of ideas and motivation for many investigators pursuing advanced research on radar target detection problems throughout the world. He currently works in the Sensors and Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory (SEAL), where he conducts research that seeks to combine advanced geometric and algebraic ideas to solve challenging radar signal processing problems. 

The IEEE is the world’s leading professional association for advancing technology for humanity. Through its 400,000-plus members in 160 countries, the association is a leading authority on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power, and consumer electronics.

Dedicated to the advancement of technology, the IEEE publishes 30 percent of the world’s literature in the electrical and electronics engineering and computer science fields, and has developed more than 1,300 active industry standards.  The association also sponsors or co-sponsors nearly 1,700 international technical conferences each year.  To learn more about IEEE or the IEEE Fellow Program, please visit www.ieee.org.

Georgia Tech’s Center for Co-design of Chip, Package System (C3PS) partners with Notre Dame in $26 million multi-university research center developing next-generation computing technologies

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John Pippin Chair in Microsystems Packaging & Electromagnetics in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and Director of the Center for Co-Design of Chip, Package, System (C3PS), Georgia Tech.
Associate Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology

In today’s era of big data, cloud computing, and Internet of Things devices, information is produced and shared on a scale that challenges the current processing speeds and energy load demands placed on electronics devices. These challenges are only set to expand, as the ability to create and store data increases in magnitude over the next decade.

With these computing challenges in mind, the Semiconductor Research Corporation's (SRC) Joint University Microelectronics Program (JUMP), which represents a consortium of industrial participants and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), has established a new $26 million center called the Applications and Systems-driven Center for Energy-Efficient integrated Nano Technologies (ASCENT).

Georgia Tech’s Center for Co-design of Chip, Package System (C3PS) led by Profs. A. Raychowdhury and M. Swaminathan, deputy director and director, respectively, both from the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and with support from the Institute of Electronics and Nanotechnology, headed-up Georgia Tech’s winning proposal that resulted in a 5 year, $3.5M award that will fund up to 10 GRA positions.

The multidisciplinary, multi-university center will focus on conducting research that aims to increase the performance, efficiency and capabilities of future computing systems for both commercial and defense applications. By going beyond current industry approaches, such as two dimensional scaling and the addition of performance boosters to complementary metal oxide semiconductors, or CMOS technology, the GT team seeks to provide enhanced performance and energy consumption at lower costs.

Profs. Raychowdhury (PI) and Swaminathan (co-PI) will work in the area of heterogeneous integration, with a focus on the design of high speed die-to-die networks, the incorporation of power, logic, memory and RF components on a common substrate that enables 2.5D and 3D integration.

“Our involvement in the ASCENT center provides us with unique opportunities to partner with the academic and industrial leaders to explore foundational technologies in computing. We will leverage our expertise on high-speed circuit design, device-circuit interactions and advanced packaging to address logic and memory challenges for next-generation computing and communication systems,” said Prof. Raychowdhury, the ON Semiconductor Jr. Associate Professor of VLSI Systems.

“Georgia Tech has always had a long history of working with SRC and we are therefore excited and honored to continue that effort through JUMP,” said Prof. M. Swaminathan, John Pippin Chair in Microsystems Packaging & Electromagnetics and C3PS director. “Through JUMP we plan on expanding our current center capabilities on power delivery, machine learning, multi-physics simulation and system design to include new circuit architectures, power converters, magnetic materials, high frequency components, vertically integrated tools and other platform technologies on a common interconnect fabric.”

This is one of the largest JUMP centers funded by SRC and will work synergistically over the next five years to provide breakthrough technologies.  Other universities involved in the 13-member team include; Notre Dame (lead), Arizona State University, Cornell University, Purdue University, Stanford University, University of Minnesota, University of California-Berkeley, University of California-Los Angeles, University of California-San Diego, University of California-Santa Barbara, University of Colorado, and the University of Texas-Dallas.

- Christa M. Ernst

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