Cressler, Romberg Honored with Prestigious IEEE Medals

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John Cressler (left) and Justin Romberg

John D. Cressler and Justin K. Romberg, both faculty members from the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), have been awarded with two of the most prestigious honors presented by the IEEE, the world’s largest technical professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for the benefit of humanity.

Cressler and Romberg were both honored with IEEE medals at the IEEE Vision, Innovation, and Challenges Summit (IEEE VIC Summit) and Honors Ceremony, held virtually May 11-13, 2021. Cressler was honored with the 2021 IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal for a career of outstanding contributions to education in the fields of interest to IEEE. Romberg was honored as a co-recipient of the 2021 IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal for outstanding contributions in signal processing.

John D. Cressler

As the recipient of the 2021 IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal, Cressler was honored “for inspirational teaching and mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students.” He was recognized with this award on May 11 by IEEE President-Elect Ray Liu.

Cressler is the third faculty member from ECE to receive this honor. Previous recipients include Ronald W. Schafer (1992) and James D. Meindl (1990, while with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute). The James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal was established in 1956 and is sponsored by Lockheed Martin, MathWorks, Pearson, and the IEEE Life Members Fund.

“This is a tremendous honor for John, and his commitment to teaching and mentoring — and to the success and well-being of our students – is a tremendous model for all of us to follow,” said Magnus Egerstedt, Steve W. Chaddick School Chair and Professor in ECE.

Cressler is the Schlumberger Chair Professor in Electronics and the Ken Byers Teaching Fellow in Science and Religion at Georgia Tech. He has been the associate director of the Georgia Electronic Design Center since 2015. Cressler joined the Georgia Tech ECE faculty in 2002 after spending a decade as a faculty member in the Department of ECE at Auburn University. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in applied physics at Columbia University and his B.S. degree in physics from Georgia Tech in 1984.

Cressler couples his passions for teaching and mentoring with being the leader of one of the largest, most visible, and most productive silicon-germanium (SiGe) research groups in the world. He and his colleagues have written over 700 refereed journal and conference papers, and he has graduated over 100 Ph.D. and master’s students who are now leaders in the electronics industry, academia, and government and research labs or who have started their own successful companies.

Cressler is a mainstay in the microelectronics instructional program in ECE and has introduced first-of-a-kind courses – CoE 3002 Introduction to the Microelectronics and Nanotechnology Revolution and ECE 6444 Silicon-based Heterostructure Devices and Circuits – that use textbooks that he has written and that have been adopted by other universities around the world. He also teaches IAC 2002 Science, Engineering, and Religion: An Interfaith Dialogue in the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts. This course is open to undergraduate students of all years and majors and has always been positively received by the students.

Cressler has received many top teaching and mentoring awards from Georgia Tech and from IEEE and Eta Kappa Nu. His goal for his Ph.D. students is to fall in love with research, while maintaining a good work-life balance, and to provide a safe place to fail and to be creative and innovative. In the classroom, Cressler believes that the keys to success are passion for what you teach, being real, being and sharing who you are and what you believe with your students, and being approachable and showing that you care.

Cressler said that teaching is his life and vocation, and he counts teaching and mentoring as his great passion in the classroom, lab, and life. “My accomplishments are best measured by the success of my students,” Cressler said. “Receiving an award for teaching and mentoring, which is something very close to my heart, means a great deal to me.”

To view Cressler’s award presentation from the IEEE VIC Summit and Honors Ceremony, please visit https://ieeetv.ieee.org/channels/communities/awards-hall-c-day-1-ieee-vic-summit-and-honors-ceremony. His presentation starts at the 6:40 mark.

Justin K. Romberg

As a co-recipient of the 2021 IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal, Romberg was honored “for groundbreaking contributions to compressed sensing.” He received this medal with his colleagues, Emmanuel Candes, who holds The Barnum-Simons Chair in Mathematics and Statistics at Stanford University, and Terence Tao, a professor of mathematics at the University of California at Los Angeles.

Romberg and his colleagues were recognized with this award on May 12 by IEEE President-Elect Liu. He is the fourth faculty member from ECE to receive this honor. Previous recipients include Thomas P. Barnwell (2014), Ronald W. Schafer (2010), and James H. McClellan (2004). The IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal was established in 1995 and is sponsored by the Kilby Medal Fund.

“This is a tremendous honor for Justin, and our amazing faculty track record in receiving this award speaks of the high regard in which our digital signal processing program is held around the world,” said Egerstedt.

Romberg holds the Schlumberger Professorship and is the associate chair for Research in ECE. He is also the senior director for the Center for Machine Learning at Georgia Tech. Romberg joined the ECE faculty in 2006 after working as a postdoctoral scholar in Applied and Computational Mathematics at Caltech for three years. He received his B.S.E.E., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Rice University in 1997, 1999, and 2004, respectively.

Romberg, Candes, and Tao were recognized for their 2006 paper, “Robust Uncertainty Principles: Exact Reconstruction from Highly Incomplete Frequency Information,” which demonstrated that structured signal samples could be reconstructed perfectly from very few samples. The paper established the field of compressed sensing, which is considered one of the most important developments in signal processing in the last 50 years.

This paper spurred a flurry of research activities, with engineers and scientists exploring ways to use compressed sensing in a variety of applications. Compressed sensing has been used in wireless sensor networks, more efficient data aggregation, and improved data recovery, and has resulted in energy-efficient network routing protocols, reduced data transmission requirements, and improved network security.

Compressed sensing has even been used in astrological imaging and medical imaging. The first images of black holes from the Event Horizon Telescope were based on compressed sensing reconstruction methods. However, the greatest success of compressed sensing can be found in MRI imaging, where the technology is used to shorten the imaging process drastically without losing image quality.

Romberg said that one of the best things about the work in compressed sensing is how it has introduced him to ideas and people in many different areas of applied mathematics, such as harmonic analysis, optimization, and applied probability and statistical learning.

“It has been extremely rewarding to be exposed to new ideas from these fields by interacting with researchers on a common problem set,” Romberg said. “It has also been a pleasure to see how this early work was translated into different problem domains and built a strong foundation for me across disciplinary research, which is something that I have valued throughout my career.”

To view Romberg’s award presentation from the IEEE VIC Summit and Honors Ceremony, please visit https://ieeetv.ieee.org/channels/communities/awards-hall-a-day-2-ieee-vic-summit-and-honors-ceremony. His presentation starts at the 4:55 mark.

Colin Potts Accepts Provost Position at Missouri S&T

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Colin Potts, vice provost for undergraduate education and professor of interactive computing at Georgia Tech, has accepted a position as provost and executive vice chancellor of Academic Affairs at Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T). He will be at Tech through late May.

Potts has led Georgia Tech’s Office of Undergraduate Education since 2012, overseeing offices and programs affecting undergraduate education including Serve-Learn-Sustain, the Honors Program, Undergraduate Advising and Transition, Academic Enrichment Programs, Tutoring and Academic Support, Complete College Georgia and Retention, Summer Session Initiatives, the Career Center, and Pre-Graduate and Pre-Professional Advising. He has led or convened task forces on academic advising, the academic calendar, and curricular flexibility. On the national scene, Potts is president of the Reinvention Collaborative, a coalition of more than 80 national research universities focusing on undergraduate education in research-intensive environments.

“We have all benefited tremendously from Colin Potts’ commitment to the students, faculty, and staff of Georgia Tech,” said Steven McLaughlin, provost and executive vice president for Academic Affairs. “The same innovative spirit in his teaching and research is reflected in his leadership. He redesigned and strengthened academic advising and led the consolidation of Career Services and Cooperative Education to create C2D2. I am also personally very grateful for his work on the Strategic Plan Steering Committee and the Georgia Tech Covid-19 Task Force. Over the past almost three decades, he has left his mark on Georgia Tech, and I know he will make great contributions in his new role at Missouri S&T.”

Potts joined the Georgia Tech faculty in 1992 and is a professor in the School of Interactive Computing. His research has spanned the fields of requirements engineering, software design methods, human-computer interaction, and information privacy. Potts designed and taught courses at all levels in software engineering, human-computer interaction design and the social implications of computing, and received the 2010 William “Gus” Baird Faculty Teaching Award and the 2012 Eichholz Faculty Teaching Award. He frequently teaches introductory courses in computer science to non-majors. He has conducted nine study abroad programs in Oxford and Barcelona, and has led a living learning community.

In 2014, the Georgia Tech Undergraduate House of Representatives presented him with the Dean James E. Dull Administrator of the Year Award. That same year, the Georgia Tech Student Ambassadors presented him with the Modern Day Aristotle Award. 

Before joining Georgia Tech, Potts worked as a senior member of the technical staff at Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation in Austin. A native of England, he earned a Ph.D. from Sheffield University in cognitive psychology.

The Office of Undergraduate Education will remain under his leadership while a search commences. Details on the search process and the leadership transition will be announced later this spring.

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Atlanta, GA

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patti.futrell@comm.gatech.edu

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Patti Futrell

Faculty Communications Program Manager

Institute Communications

Yves Berthelot, Vice Provost for International Initiatives, to Retire

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Yves Berthelot, vice provost for International Initiatives, Steven A. Denning Chair in Global Engagement, president of Georgia Tech-Lorraine (GTL), and professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, has announced that he will retire June 30, 2021, after 36 years of service to Georgia Tech. 

“Yves has always championed the necessity of global cooperation in solving the great challenges of the 21st century,” said Steven McLaughlin, provost and executive vice president for Academic Affairs. “His leadership, diplomatic talent, and vision have been instrumental in the development of Georgia Tech’s international presence. We will miss him, and we wish him the very best in retirement.”

Berthelot took the role of vice provost for International Initiatives in 2012, directing the Institute’s Global Positioning Strategy and significantly growing international activities in education, research, economic development, and alumni outreach in Europe, Asia, and Latin America.

Prior to taking the role of vice provost for International Initiatives, Berthelot served as the president of GTL in Metz, France, a position he has held since 2005. Berthelot was instrumental in launching the undergraduate program at GTL, which resulted in significant growth in student enrollment. Each year, close to 700 undergraduate and graduate students study at the Lorraine campus. In 2006, GTL launched the Unité Mixte Internationale (UMI) 2958 GT-CNRS, a unique international joint laboratory between Georgia Tech and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS). Renamed International Research Laboratories (IRL) by CNRS in 2020, this international partnership fueled significant growth at GTL over the past several years. In 2014, the campus celebrated the launch of the Lafayette Institute, a $30 million facility that facilitates the commercialization of innovations in optoelectronics. Georgia Tech's international initiatives reached another milestone in 2016, when the Institute formalized its presence in China by establishing a campus in the high-tech city of Shenzhen.

Berthelot was also closely involved in the inception and launch of France-Atlanta in 2010, an annual series of high-caliber events focused on innovation and designed to foster transatlantic cooperation and exchange. Over its 11 years of existence, France-Atlanta has grown into a multidisciplinary affair, with 3,000 scholars, artists, and visionaries exchanging ideas and exploring possible areas of cooperation at its events each year. France-Atlanta has led to lasting partnerships with local institutions, including a startup exchange program between the cities of Atlanta and Toulouse, the creation of an International Associated Library, and an education series that has reached nearly 5,000 students by bringing French-speaking professionals into metro Atlanta classrooms.

A native of France, Berthelot first joined the faculty at Georgia Tech in 1985. Early in his career, his passions for music and engineering led him to combine those interests, specializing in acoustics, sound, and ultrasound throughout his academic career. He holds two patents and has received numerous awards for his research in laser ultrasonics.

Berthelot will remain vice provost for International Initiatives while a search commences. Details on the search process and the leadership transition will be announced later this spring.

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Atlanta, GA

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susie.ivy@comm.gatech.edu

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Susie Ivy

Director of Organizational, Academic, and Research Communications

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Harris Tapped for 40 Under 40 Awards

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Joyelle Harris was one of 40 individuals from the metro Atlanta area who were honored at the 2017 Atlanta Business Chronicle 40 Under 40 Awards. An academic professional in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), Harris and her fellow honorees were recognized at an event held at the Foundry at Puritan Mill on November 8.

The 40 Under 40 Awards honor young movers and shakers who are making a mark in their industries and leading in their communities. Harris was specifically recognized for her work as director of the Engineering for Social Innovation (ESI) Center and as co-director of the Grand Challenges Scholars Program, both of which are initiatives housed in the Georgia Tech College of Engineering (CoE), and for her work as executive director of the Council of Schools and Services for the Blind. She was also honored for her prior contributions to the community through her work at Oak Ridge National Labs, Exponent, and Intel.   

Through ESI, Harris enables hundreds of students each year to use their coursework and technical skills for significant, positive social impact in community projects throughout Atlanta and all over the world. In her ESI work, she empowers her community partners by incorporating their needs and desires into solutions that are sustainable and desirable. In the CoE Grand Challenges Scholars Program, Harris works with students who want to tackle today’s science, engineering, and technology challenges in areas like cybersecurity and global access to healthcare.

Harris was also recognized for her work with several student organizations, including Engineers Without Borders, which helps to improve the infrastructure of communities throughout the developing world, and Enterprise to Empower, an organization that helps students launch nontraditional, impact careers.

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Atlanta, GA

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jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

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Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Weitnauer Receives Radio Club of America Award

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Mary Ann Weitnauer has been named the recipient of the Vivian A. Carr Award, which will be presented by the Radio Club of America (RCA) at its 108th Banquet and Awards Presentation on November 17 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The Vivian A. Carr Award recognizes outstanding achievements by a woman in the wireless industry, and the award’s namesake was a senior executive at Bell Labs and the first female member of the RCA, which is the world’s oldest wireless organization.  

A member of the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) faculty since 1989 and ECE’s Senior Associate Chair, Weitnauer leads the Smart Antenna Research Laboratory (SARL), which performs both experimental and theoretical studies. Her research since the mid 1990s has been focused on the lower three layers of MIMO wireless networks that have virtual or distributed antenna arrays, with emphasis on wireless LAN, ad hoc, mesh, and sensor networks.

Recent SARL activities include synchronization for distributed or virtual arrays, nonlinear precoding and interference alignment for wireless LANS with distributed MIMO access points, modeling the residual from interference cancellation, distributed array-based network time synchronization, and millimeter wave communications.

Location

Atlanta, GA

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jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

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Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Ougazzaden Appointed to National Academy of Metz

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Prof. Abdallah Ougazzaden (left) &amp Mr. Jean-François Muller, Président de l’Académie Nationale de Metz (right)

Abdallah Ougazzaden has been named to the National Academy of Metz as a honorary member. He is a professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and is the director of Georgia Tech-Lorraine.

This nomination recognizes Ougazzaden’s reputation in the field of science and technology and his contributions to the visibility and global reach of the city of Metz, located in the Lorraine Region of France. He received this honor at the monthly meeting of the Academy on December 7, 2017 from its president, Jean-François Muller. The National Academy of Metz was founded in 1757 as the Society for the Study of Sciences and the Arts. In the 19th century, the Academy’s mission became more scientific than literary due to the presence of several engineering and technical schools in Metz. 

In addition to serving as director of Georgia Tech-Lorraine, Ougazzaden leads the Unité Mixte Internationale UMI 2958 GT-CNRS, an international research center with laboratories in both Metz and Atlanta. Cutting-edge research in secure networks and innovative materials has also led to the creation of the Institut Lafayette, where Ougazzaden serves as co-president. Institut Lafayette promotes technology transfer from Georgia Tech-Lorraine’s research laboratories and transatlantic industrial research and development opportunities in the optoelectronics sector.

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Atlanta, GA

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jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

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Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Georgia Tech’s Center for Co-design of Chip, Package System (C3PS) partners with Notre Dame in $26 million multi-university research center developing next-generation computing technologies

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John Pippin Chair in Microsystems Packaging & Electromagnetics in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and Director of the Center for Co-Design of Chip, Package, System (C3PS), Georgia Tech.
Associate Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology

In today’s era of big data, cloud computing, and Internet of Things devices, information is produced and shared on a scale that challenges the current processing speeds and energy load demands placed on electronics devices. These challenges are only set to expand, as the ability to create and store data increases in magnitude over the next decade.

With these computing challenges in mind, the Semiconductor Research Corporation's (SRC) Joint University Microelectronics Program (JUMP), which represents a consortium of industrial participants and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), has established a new $26 million center called the Applications and Systems-driven Center for Energy-Efficient integrated Nano Technologies (ASCENT).

Georgia Tech’s Center for Co-design of Chip, Package System (C3PS) led by Profs. A. Raychowdhury and M. Swaminathan, deputy director and director, respectively, both from the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and with support from the Institute of Electronics and Nanotechnology, headed-up Georgia Tech’s winning proposal that resulted in a 5 year, $3.5M award that will fund up to 10 GRA positions.

The multidisciplinary, multi-university center will focus on conducting research that aims to increase the performance, efficiency and capabilities of future computing systems for both commercial and defense applications. By going beyond current industry approaches, such as two dimensional scaling and the addition of performance boosters to complementary metal oxide semiconductors, or CMOS technology, the GT team seeks to provide enhanced performance and energy consumption at lower costs.

Profs. Raychowdhury (PI) and Swaminathan (co-PI) will work in the area of heterogeneous integration, with a focus on the design of high speed die-to-die networks, the incorporation of power, logic, memory and RF components on a common substrate that enables 2.5D and 3D integration.

“Our involvement in the ASCENT center provides us with unique opportunities to partner with the academic and industrial leaders to explore foundational technologies in computing. We will leverage our expertise on high-speed circuit design, device-circuit interactions and advanced packaging to address logic and memory challenges for next-generation computing and communication systems,” said Prof. Raychowdhury, the ON Semiconductor Jr. Associate Professor of VLSI Systems.

“Georgia Tech has always had a long history of working with SRC and we are therefore excited and honored to continue that effort through JUMP,” said Prof. M. Swaminathan, John Pippin Chair in Microsystems Packaging & Electromagnetics and C3PS director. “Through JUMP we plan on expanding our current center capabilities on power delivery, machine learning, multi-physics simulation and system design to include new circuit architectures, power converters, magnetic materials, high frequency components, vertically integrated tools and other platform technologies on a common interconnect fabric.”

This is one of the largest JUMP centers funded by SRC and will work synergistically over the next five years to provide breakthrough technologies.  Other universities involved in the 13-member team include; Notre Dame (lead), Arizona State University, Cornell University, Purdue University, Stanford University, University of Minnesota, University of California-Berkeley, University of California-Los Angeles, University of California-San Diego, University of California-Santa Barbara, University of Colorado, and the University of Texas-Dallas.

- Christa M. Ernst

Butera Named as IEEE EMBS Distinguished Lecturer

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Robert J. Butera

Robert J. Butera has been named as a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS) for a two-year term, which began on January 1, 2018 and will end on December 31, 2019.

The areas in which Butera will present lectures include bioelectric medicine, electrophysiology, nerve stimulation, computational neuroscience, and the maker movement and problem-based learning.

A member of the Georgia Tech faculty since 1999, Butera is the associate dean for Research and Innovation in the College of Engineering. He is a professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and holds a joint appointment in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering. 

Prior to joining the Dean’s Office, Butera led the Neural Engineering Center from 2014-2016 and served as founding faculty director of the Grand Challenges Living Learning Community from 2012-2015. He is a member of the Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and is a faculty member in the Interdisciplinary Bioengineering Graduate Program; he served as the program’s director from 2005-2008. 

Butera is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and he is the vice president for publications for IEEE EMBS.

Coyle Tapped for SUNY-Industry Conference Award

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Edward J. Coyle presented with award at SUNY Industry Conference and Showcase

Edward J. Coyle received the “Advancing Civic Engagement and Socially Beneficial Science and Engineering” Award at the SUNY-Industry Conference and Showcase: Science and Engineering for Social Good. The conference was held June 3-5, 2018 at Stony Brook, New York. 

Conference themes included areas of critical civic and social importance: energy and environment, health, broadening participation in STEM (human resource development), education and the technological workforce, integrating STEM and the arts and humanities, infrastructure development, technology and security, social media, and data science.

Coyle took part in this conference as one of the plenary speakers and represented the Vertically Integrated Projects (VIP) Program at Georgia Tech. He was nominated for this award by David Ferguson who is a Distinguished Service Professor of Technology and Society and Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Stony Brook University and was presented the award by Samuel Stanley, the president of Stony Brook University. 

Coyle has been a member of the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) faculty since 2008. He holds the John B. Peatman Distinguished Professorship and is a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar. Coyle leads the Arbutus Center for the Integration of Research and Education and the Vertically Integrated Projects Program (VIP), which develop strategies for systemic reform of higher education in all disciplines. 

VIP unites undergraduate education and faculty research in a team-based context and involves faculty from almost all colleges at Georgia Tech and the Georgia Tech Research Institute. Undergraduate VIP students earn academic credits, while faculty and graduate students benefit from the design/discovery efforts of their teams. VIP research projects are multidisciplinary and range from robotics applications of many kinds to intelligent transportation systems to automobile design to brain trauma assessment.

Cutline for photograph (above): Edward J. Coyle is presented with the Advancing Civic Engagement and Socially Beneficial Science and Engineering” Award by David Ferguson (left) and Stony Brook University President google.comSamuel Stanley (right)

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Bhatti Appointed as IEEE J-TEHM Editor-in-Chief

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Pamela Bhatti

Pamela Bhatti has been appointed as the editor-in-chief of the IEEE Journal of Translational Engineering in Health and Medicine (J-TEHM) for a three-year term, beginning January 1, 2019. The IEEE J-TEHM is a peer-reviewed, open-access scholarly journal and community forum that bridges the engineering and clinical worlds. 

Bhatti joined the faculty of the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) in 2007, where she is currently an associate professor and leads the Translational Biosystems Research Laboratory. Her research interests are in the areas of biomedical sensors and subsystems, cochlear and vestibular neural prostheses, and improving imaging of cardiac vasculature through cardiac inertial sensing combined with machine learning algorithms.

Bhatti serves as the Georgia Tech co-director for the KL2 and TL1 training programs that are sponsored by the Georgia Clinical and Translational Science Alliance (CTSA) and supported by the National Institutes of Health, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS). Her mission is to train the next generation of clinical researchers to impact health in Georgia and beyond.

In 2016, Bhatti co-founded Camerad Technologies, a company dedicated to improving throughput and quality in radiology imaging. She is also an entrepreneurship educator and coach with the I-Corps@NCATS program, as well as for the Georgia Tech CREATE-X and InVenture Prize programs.

Bhatti is a previous recipient of an NSF CAREER Award, which she used to focus on vestibular rehabilitation, and she also received the Georgia Tech Class of 1934 Outstanding Interdisciplinary Activities Award in 2017.

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