Cressler Honored with 2020 Outstanding Educator Award by IEEE Atlanta Section

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John Cressler will receive the 2020 Outstanding Educator Award from the IEEE Atlanta Section at a virtual banquet hosted by the group on November 10. This award is presented to a member of the Atlanta IEEE community who has exhibited continued and dedicated contributions to education through teaching in industry, government, or an institution of higher education.

Cressler has been a faculty member in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) faculty since 2002. He is currently the Schlumberger Chair Professor in Electronics and the Ken Byers Teaching Fellow in Science and Religion. 

A mainstay in the ECE microelectronics instructional program, Cressler has also introduced three new courses into three different areas of the Georgia Tech curriculum, ECE 6444: “Silicon-based Heterostructure Devices and Circuits;” CoE 3002: “Introduction to the Microelectronics and Nanotechnology Revolution;” and IAC 2002: “Science, Engineering, and Religion: An Interfaith Dialogue,” which is taught through the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts.  

Cressler has written books for each of these three courses. Silicon Earth (2016), now in its second edition and also translated into Chinese. Meant for a general audience, the book serves CoE 3002, which is intended for all majors, including both business and liberal arts students. Silicon-Germanium Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors (2003, with G. Niu) is the most widely cited textbook in this field and serves his graduate course, ECE 6444. In all of his courses during his 28+ year career, Cressler ends each of his classes, including IAC 2002, with a handed-out quotation and a sharing of a personal reflection relevant to his students’ lives. For this purpose, he compiled over 600 quotations and reflections in the book, Reinventing Teenagers (2004).

Cressler's career-long teaching effectiveness average is a 4.9, and he is a fully dedicated mentor to the students in his classes. On the research side, Cressler has mentored and graduated 60 Ph.D. students during his academic career (50 at Georgia Tech), and he and his team have published over 750 archival papers. The graduates of his research group have continued onto successful and meaningful careers in industry, academia, and government labs and agencies.

Cressler has received several high-level IEEE teaching and mentoring awards and has been presented with Georgia Tech’s top honors in undergraduate teaching and graduate student mentoring. In 2013, he was recognized with Georgia Tech's highest award for faculty, the Class of 1934 Distinguished Professor Award.

Khan Recognized with 2020 Intel Rising Star Award

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Asif Khan has been named as one of the 10 awardees of the 2020 Intel Rising Star Award. Khan is an assistant professor at the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

The purpose of the program is to help promote the careers of early career faculty members who show great promise as future academic leaders in disruptive computing technologies and to foster long term collaborative relationships with Intel. The awards were given based on progressive research in computer science, engineering, and social science in support of the global digital transition in the following areas: software, security, interconnect, memory, architecture, and process.

Khan joined the ECE faculty in 2017, with a courtesy appointment with the School of Materials Science and Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer sciences from the University of California, Berkeley in 2015.

Khan’s research is on advanced semiconductor devices—devices that will shape the future of computing in the post-scaling era. His group is currently focusing on ferroelectric devices on all aspects ranging from materials physics, growth and electron microscopy to device fabrication, all the way to ferroelectric circuits and systems for artificial intelligence/machine learning/variable load applications. 

His research group consists of five graduate students and two research staff members. They publish in venues such as the International Electron Devices Meeting, the Symposium on VLSI Technology and CircuitsIEEE Electron Device Letters, IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices, Nature Electronics, Nature Materials, Nano Letters, and Nature.

Khan’s program is supported by the National Science Foundation, the Semiconductor Research Corporation, and the Defense Advanced Research Program Agency. His Ph.D. research led to the first experimental demonstration of the negative capacitance effect in ferroelectrics, which can reduce the energy dissipation in CMOS technology below the fundamental thermodynamic (Boltzmann) limit. One of his publications was cited as one of the nine significant papers in the history of ferroelectricity in a 2020 editorial article in Nature Materials, celebrating the 100th year since the discovery of ferroelectricity in 1920.

Zajic Appointed as a Ken Byers Professor

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Alenka Zajic has been appointed as a Ken Byers Professor, effective October 1, 2020. Zajic is a member of the faculty at the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), where she currently holds the rank of associate professor.  

After graduating from Georgia Tech with her Ph.D. in 2008, Zajic spent a year as a postdoctoral fellow at the Naval Research Laboratory and two years as a visiting assistant professor in Tech's School of Computer Science. In 2012, she joined ECE as an assistant professor, and in 2017, she was promoted to associate professor. 

Zajic leads the Electromagnetic Measurements in Communications and Computing Laboratory, where she advises 10 Ph.D. students and two postdoctoral fellows who work in the areas of propagation, enabling communication, and improving data security in challenging environments, such as vehicle-to-vehicle wireless radio communications, underwater acoustic communications, and communications inside a processor chip. To date, Zajic has graduated nine Ph.D. students and five M.S. students. She advises undergraduate students on individual projects and through the Opportunity Research Scholars Program. Zajic and her research group have received six best paper, poster, or demonstration awards since she joined ECE as a faculty member.

Zajic’s specific research interests focus on understanding mechanisms that generate electromagnetic (EM) side-channel emanations in modern computers and on locating sources of information-carrying EM emanations in complex environments. She has received over $18 million in research funding as a PI or co-PI, mostly from NSF, DARPA, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Zajic has published over 140 refereed journal and conference publications. She has three awarded patents and five patent applications pending. Her work has been publicized locally and internationally through The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, NSF Science 360, Voice of America, Wired, and many other outlets. Zajic has served as an editor of the IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications and Wiley Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies. She also served as the chair of the Atlanta chapter of the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society/Antennas and Propagation Society from 2015-2017, and during that time, the group received the IEEE Outstanding Chapter Award in 2016. She received the IEEE Atlanta Section Outstanding Engineer Award in 2019. 

Equally devoted to teaching excellence and service, Zajic has developed or redesigned both undergraduate and graduate courses and has taught a flipped classroom version of ECE 3025–Electromagnetics. For her efforts, she has received several teaching awards, including the Richard M. Bass/Eta Kappa Nu Outstanding Junior Teacher Award in 2016 and the LexisNexis Dean’s Excellence Award in 2016-2017. Zajic has also participated in the Center for Teaching and Learning’s Class of 1969 Teaching Scholars Program. She is an active member of the ECE and Georgia Tech community, currently serving as the director of the M.S. Cybersecurity degree program; a member of the ECE Statutory Advisory Committee; a member of the College of Engineering Reappointment, Promotion, and Tenure committee; and a member of a working group on the professional development of graduate students, an initiative coordinated from the Provost’s Office.

Two Georgia Tech Faculty Members Named to Governor’s Teaching Fellows Program

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Georgia Tech faculty members Flavio Fenton and Anna Holcomb have been chosen to take part in the 25thannual Governor’s Teaching Fellows Program for the 2020-2021 school year. This year’s cohort of fellows was announced earlier this month by the Institute of Higher Education (IHE) at the University of Georgia.

Only two faculty members from each of the 26 University System of Georgia institutions are invited to participate in the program. Fenton is a professor in the School of Physics, and Holcomb is a lecturer in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and serves as its assistant director of the Undergraduate Professional Communication Program (UPCP). Each invitee must work on a project during their fellowship year that will benefit both the faculty member and their school. 

According to the IHE’s web page, the Teaching Fellows Program was established in 1995 by former Governor Zell Miller to provide Georgia's higher education faculty with expanded opportunities for developing important teaching skills. Participants are selected “on the basis of their teaching experience, their interest in continuing instructional and professional development, their ability to make a positive impact on their own campus, and a strong commitment by their home institution for release time and other forms of support for the duration of their participation in the program.”  

For his fellowship project, Fenton is creating a large database of physics demonstrations to be used in Georgia Tech’s Physics I course, taken by nearly 2,000 students each year.

“The idea is to have at least two real-life demos for each class given in the semester to help exemplify the physics concept introduced in the class, which will be over 80 experimental demonstrations,” Fenton says. “The demos can also help students stay focused and motivated and provide new opportunities for students to engage with the material as they connect theory with reality in an interactive way. The demos will also be recorded while being demonstrated so that they can be used by instructors in other institutions if they do not have direct access to the equipment.”

“Being a Governor’s teaching fellow is a great honor for me,” Fenton continued. “Not only is it allowing me to further my teaching skills, but also it is making me transform how I approach teaching. This year-long program allows me to spend three days a month interacting closely with enthusiastic and thoughtful educators from other colleges and universities of Georgia and learning about several instructional techniques that have been new to me. The diverse composition in teaching fields of the teaching fellows cohort has opened me to new ways of thinking that will have an impact on how I select and organize course content and delivery in all my future courses.”

Fenton came to Georgia Tech in 2012 as an associate professor, and was made a full professor in 2018. He received his B.S. in Physics from Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico in Mexico City, and a M.S. and Ph.D. in Physics from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. Fenton and School of Physics colleague Carlos Silva were elected in 2019 to the American Physics Society Fellows program. Fenton has also won the 2017 Junior Faculty Outstanding Undergraduate Research Mentor Award, the 2017 Geoffrey B. Eichholz Faculty Teaching Award, and the 2018 Faculty Award for Academic Outreach.

Holcomb’s fellowship project is a formative evaluation of the new early-intervention communications course that is now being redeveloped as the new 1000-level ECE Discovery Studio. 

“The 1000-level ECE Discovery Studio will be a required course for incoming ECE students, including all first-years and transfers. The purpose for the course is to introduce students to the world of ECE and real-world problems that are being addressed in the field,” Holcomb said. “Students will be introduced to the new ECE curriculum threads and learn about possible career paths for electrical engineering and computer engineering majors. The ECE Discovery Studio will also allow students to begin building the professional communication skillset needed to explore early career opportunities like internships, co-ops, undergraduate research, and extracurriculars.” 

"The Governor’s Teaching Fellows Program provides me with dedicated time to perform a formative evaluation of the content and instructional practice of ECE’s new Discovery Studio as it launches this semester,” Holcomb continued. “I am collecting student insights and performing in-time calibrations in preparation for the second run of the new course in Spring 2021, which will be incredibly beneficial to the School and our students. The program also facilitates continued development of my teaching skills in a diverse professional learning community. During a time when so many of us are working remotely, connecting with the other fellows, even remotely, has provided a surge of excitement for the new school year and teaching virtually."

Holcomb joined ECE in 2017 and previously worked in the Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Computing in the Georgia Tech College of Sciences. She received her M.S. in Educational Research with a concentration in Research, Measurement, and Statistics at Georgia State University and B.S. in Public Policy at Georgia Tech. Holcomb is also highly involved in the faculty development programs offered at Georgia Tech by both the Center for Teaching and Learning and the Office of Faculty Affairs and by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). She presented at Georgia Tech’s Celebrating Teaching Day in 2018 and will co-present with ECE UPCP Director Christina Bourgeois at a session at ASEE's annual conference in 2021, which will be held in Long Beach, California.

Writers: Jackie Nemeth, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Renay San Miguel, College of Sciences Dean's Office

Lambert Named President-Elect of IEEE PES

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Frank Lambert

Frank Lambert has been named president-elect for the IEEE Power and Energy Society (PES). His appointment to this role is effective on January 1, 2018, and he will serve in this capacity through 2019.

Lambert will then serve as the IEEE PES president in 2020-2021 and as its past president in 2022-2023. The IEEE PES provides the world’s largest forum for sharing the latest in technological developments in the electric power industry, for developing standards that guide the development and construction of equipment and systems, and for educating members of the industry and the general public.   

Lambert is a principal research engineer at the Georgia Tech National Electric Energy Testing, Research, and Applications Center (NEETRAC) and the Center for Distributed Energy. After spending the first 22 years of his career working at Georgia Power, Lambert came to Georgia Tech in 1996, where he helped to establish NEETRAC, an electric energy-focused research and testing consortium with over 40 electric utility and manufacturing members.

Lambert’s research interests are in power delivery systems, electric vehicles, sensors and communications systems for smart grid, power flow control, and integration of renewable energy into the grid. He earned bachelor's and master's degrees in electrical engineering, both from Georgia Tech. 

Saltaformaggio Wins ACM SIGSAC Doctoral Dissertation Award

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Brendan Saltaformaggio

Brendan Saltaformaggio received the 2017 ACM SIGSAC Doctoral Dissertation Award at the ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (ACM CCS), which was held October 30-November 3 in Dallas, Texas. SIGSAC is the Special Interest Group on Security, Audit, and Control in the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

An assistant professor at the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), Saltaformaggio was recognized for his Ph.D. dissertation, “Convicted by Memory: Automatically Recovering Spatial-Temporal Evidence from Memory Images.” He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Purdue University in 2016.

Saltaformaggio’s dissertation pioneered new cyber forensic techniques that help investigators solve crimes. Much of his work focused on memory image forensics, a key area in cyber forensics that involves recovering digital evidence from memory (RAM) images captured from the criminal or victim's device such as a PC or smartphone.

Saltaformaggio’s dissertation challenged the state-of-the-art of memory forensics by breaking away from brute force data-carving approaches. Instead, his research developed a series of binary-analysis-driven techniques that automatically reconstruct and render in-memory forensic evidence, even if a suspect has locked or encrypted their device.

A member of the ECE faculty since this past July, Saltaformaggio leads the Cyber Forensics Innovation (CyFI) Laboratory. The CyFI Lab's mission is to further the investigation of advanced cyber crimes and the analysis and prevention of next-generation malware attacks, particularly in mobile and IoT environments. He is also a member of Georgia Tech’s Institute for Information Security & Privacy.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Stüber Selected for IEEE Communications Society RCC Award

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Gordon Stüber

Gordon L. Stüber has been named the recipient of the 2017 IEEE Communications Society Radio Communications Committee (RCC) Technical Recognition Award. The award will be presented at the next RCC meeting, which will be held during IEEE GLOBECOM 2017 on December 4-8 in Singapore.

The RCC Technical Recognition Award aims to promote radio communications research and development activities in both academia and industry. 

Stüber has been on the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) faculty since 1986 and currently holds the Joseph M. Pettit Chair Professorship. He leads the research of the Wireless Systems Laboratory, which focuses on physical layer wireless communications and communication signal processing.

Stüber has published over 300 refereed journal and conference papers in these areas and has graduated 32 Ph.D. students. He is also the author of the textbook, Principles of Wireless Communications, 4/e, 2017. Stüber has served as an elected Member-at-Large on the IEEE Communication Society Board of Governors, and is currently an elected Member of the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society Board of Governors, where he serves as the Awards Committee Chair. 

Harris Tapped for 40 Under 40 Awards

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Joyelle Harris was one of 40 individuals from the metro Atlanta area who were honored at the 2017 Atlanta Business Chronicle 40 Under 40 Awards. An academic professional in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), Harris and her fellow honorees were recognized at an event held at the Foundry at Puritan Mill on November 8.

The 40 Under 40 Awards honor young movers and shakers who are making a mark in their industries and leading in their communities. Harris was specifically recognized for her work as director of the Engineering for Social Innovation (ESI) Center and as co-director of the Grand Challenges Scholars Program, both of which are initiatives housed in the Georgia Tech College of Engineering (CoE), and for her work as executive director of the Council of Schools and Services for the Blind. She was also honored for her prior contributions to the community through her work at Oak Ridge National Labs, Exponent, and Intel.   

Through ESI, Harris enables hundreds of students each year to use their coursework and technical skills for significant, positive social impact in community projects throughout Atlanta and all over the world. In her ESI work, she empowers her community partners by incorporating their needs and desires into solutions that are sustainable and desirable. In the CoE Grand Challenges Scholars Program, Harris works with students who want to tackle today’s science, engineering, and technology challenges in areas like cybersecurity and global access to healthcare.

Harris was also recognized for her work with several student organizations, including Engineers Without Borders, which helps to improve the infrastructure of communities throughout the developing world, and Enterprise to Empower, an organization that helps students launch nontraditional, impact careers.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Weitnauer Receives Radio Club of America Award

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Mary Ann Weitnauer has been named the recipient of the Vivian A. Carr Award, which will be presented by the Radio Club of America (RCA) at its 108th Banquet and Awards Presentation on November 17 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The Vivian A. Carr Award recognizes outstanding achievements by a woman in the wireless industry, and the award’s namesake was a senior executive at Bell Labs and the first female member of the RCA, which is the world’s oldest wireless organization.  

A member of the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) faculty since 1989 and ECE’s Senior Associate Chair, Weitnauer leads the Smart Antenna Research Laboratory (SARL), which performs both experimental and theoretical studies. Her research since the mid 1990s has been focused on the lower three layers of MIMO wireless networks that have virtual or distributed antenna arrays, with emphasis on wireless LAN, ad hoc, mesh, and sensor networks.

Recent SARL activities include synchronization for distributed or virtual arrays, nonlinear precoding and interference alignment for wireless LANS with distributed MIMO access points, modeling the residual from interference cancellation, distributed array-based network time synchronization, and millimeter wave communications.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Rincón-Mora Named NAI Fellow

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Gabriel A. Rincon-Mora

Gabriel Alfonso Rincón-Mora, a professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). He is part of the Class of 2017 NAI Fellows, consisting of 155 renowned academic inventors who will be inducted during the Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors. The conference will take place on April 4-6, 2018 in Washington, D.C.

A member of the ECE faculty since 2001, Rincón-Mora is being recognized for his work in energy-harvesting and power-conditioning microchips. He was a design consultant at Texas Instruments from 2001-2003 and director of the Georgia Tech Analog Consortium from 2001-2004. Prior to his tenure on the ECE faculty, Rincón-Mora was adjunct professor at Georgia Tech from 1999-2001, senior design engineer and design team leader at Texas Instruments from 1997-2001, and circuit designer at the same company while he was a Ph.D. student at Georgia Tech from 1994-1996. He earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering at Georgia Tech in 1994 and 1996.

Rincón-Mora currently leads the Georgia Tech Analog, Power, and Energy ICs Lab. He holds 25 U.S. patents and 17 foreign patents – all assigned/licensed. They have been incorporated into portable consumer products like cellular phones, laptops, and tablets since 1994. He has published nine books, four book chapters, and over 170 articles; designed over 26 commercial chips; and delivered over 125 international talks.

Rincón-Mora is a Fellow of the IEEE and a Fellow of the Institution of Engineering and Technology. He was recently named Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society (CASS) for 2018-19, the second time that he has received this honor. He will speak on the topics of energizing and powering microsystems and energy-harvesting power supplies. He also serves as technical program committee co-chair for the IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS), to be held May 26-29, 2019 in Sapporo, Japan.

Rincón-Mora is the recipient of the National Hispanic in Technology Award from the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, the Charles E. Perry Visionary Award from Florida International University, a Commendation Certificate from the Lieutenant Governor of California, the IEEE Service Award from IEEE CASS, the Orgullo Hispano and the Hispanic Heritage awards from Robins Air Force Base, a Certificate of Appreciation from IEEE CASS, and two Thank a Teacher Certificates from Georgia Tech. Georgia Tech has also inducted him into its Council of Outstanding Young Engineering Alumni and Hispanic Business magazine named him one of "The 100 Most Influential Hispanics."

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional accolade bestowed to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society. To learn more about the 2017 class of NAI Fellows, visit the NAI website.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

 

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