Coogan Receives NSF CAREER Award

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Sam Coogan

Sam Coogan has received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award for his research project entitled “Correct-By-Design Control of Traffic Flow Networks.”

Coogan is an assistant professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and holds a joint appointment in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. He joined Georgia Tech in August 2017 after serving as an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Today's cities accommodate more people than ever before, leading to transportation networks that operate at or near capacity. In addition, the next generation of transportation systems will include connected vehicles, connected infrastructure, and increased automation, and these advances must coexist with legacy technology into the foreseeable future. Accommodating these rapidly developing advancements requires smarter and more efficient use of existing infrastructure with guarantees of performance, safety, and interoperability.

The goal of Coogan’s project is to develop fundamental theory and domain-driven techniques for controlling traffic flow in large-scale transportation networks. Recent advances in inexpensive sensors, wireless technology, and the Internet of Things (IoT) enable real-time connectivity of vehicles and infrastructure that offers abundant data and unprecedented opportunities for efficient and optimized transportation systems.

The main technical goal of the project is to develop techniques and algorithms that are correct-by-design, ensuring that these transportation systems satisfy required operating specifications. In pursuit of this goal, the project will first develop models of traffic flow from rich data streams and then will leverage these models to enable scalable control approaches.

In addition, this project will integrate a forward-looking education plan that will introduce a Control Grand Challenge design competition in the introductory course in control theory for undergraduates. For this competition, students will design a controller for an autonomous, scale-model car and then compete with their design.

Coogan Tapped for AFOSR Young Investigator Award

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Sam Coogan

Sam Coogan has been chosen for an Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Award for his research project entitled "Scalable Analysis and Control of Dynamic Flow Networks.” Coogan is an assistant professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

Coogan’s project will develop fundamental theory for controlling and designing networks that model the flow of physical material among interconnected components. These systems are called physical flow networks and are used to model, for example, vehicular transportation networks, air traffic networks, and civil infrastructure. The fundamental commonalities of such flow networks suggest a unified approach for modeling, while domain-specific features point towards a full understanding of their rich behavior. 

In physical flow networks, nonlinearities in each component compound due to the network interactions. For example, congestion in one link of a road network can impact traffic flow in other parts of the network over time. In applications, such networks are becoming larger, more complex, and increasingly distributed, and there is an urgent need to study the mathematical models that underlie many of these systems. The proposed research will focus on using and extending tools from nonlinear system analysis to study and control these physical flow networks.

Coogan holds a joint faculty appointment with Georgia Tech’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Prior to joining Georgia Tech in 2017, he was an assistant professor in the Electrical Engineering Department at the University of California, Los Angeles from 2015-2017. 

In January 2018, Coogan received an NSF CAREER Award to study the control of traffic networks with an emphasis on autonomy, and in December 2017, he received the IEEE Transactions on Control of Network Systems Best Paper Award at the 56th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control. 

Coogan Named as Demetrius T. Paris Junior Professor

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Sam Coogan has been appointed to the Demetrius T. Paris Junior Professorship, effective December 1, 2018. A professorship for untenured faculty members in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), this position was previously held by Hua Wang. 

Coogan joined the ECE faculty in July 2017 after two years on the faculty at UCLA. He is a member of the systems and controls technical interest group and holds a joint appointment in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. 

Coogan’s research is in dynamical systems and autonomy and focuses on developing scalable tools for verification and control of networked, cyber-physical systems. He and his team of nine graduate students are interested in applying these tools to create efficient, intelligent, and autonomous transportation systems. He is a member of the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines and the Supply Chain and Logistics Institute. 

Coogan received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Georgia Tech and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Before joining Tech as a faculty member, he was an assistant professor in the Electrical Engineering Department at UCLA from 2015-2017.

Coogan has published almost 40 refereed journal and conference papers. Since arriving at Tech last year, he has won a National Science Foundation CAREER Award and an Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Award. Coogan also received the IEEE Transactions on Control of Network Systems Outstanding Paper Award in 2017.

Coogan Selected for ACC Donald P. Eckman Award

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Sam Coogan received the 2020 Donald P. Eckman Award at the American Control Conference, which was held July 1-3 in an online format. Coogan is the Demetrius T. Paris Junior Professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

The Eckman Award recognizes an outstanding young engineer in the field of automatic control. The recipient must be younger than 35 years on January 1 of the year of award. Contributions may be technical or scientific publications, theses, patents, inventions, or combinations of these items in the field of automatic control made while the nominee was a resident of the USA.

Coogan’s research is in the area of dynamical systems and autonomy and focuses on developing fundamental theory for verification and control of networked and autonomous systems with an emphasis on applications in transportation systems. His recent work has, for example, studied ride-sharing fleets with a mix of autonomous and human-driven vehicles, efficient charging of electric vehicles at shared charging facilities, and algorithms for safe coordination and control of multi-vehicle teams. His work has been supported by a Young Investigator Award from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research in 2018 and a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation in 2018.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

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