Calhoun Elected as OHBM Fellow

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Vince Calhoun

Vince Calhoun has been elected as a Fellow of the Organization of Human Brain Mapping (OHBM). OHBM is an international society dedicated to using neuroimaging to discover the organization of the human brain.

Calhoun is the Distinguished University Professor of Psychology at Georgia State University. He is the director of the Center for Advanced Brain Imaging, a joint venture between Georgia State University and Georgia Tech. Calhoun is also the founding director of the Center for Translational Research in Neuroimaging and Data Science, a tri-institutional effort supported by Georgia State, Georgia Tech, and Emory University to increase cooperation among Atlanta brain imaging researchers.

Calhoun is a Georgia Research Alliance (GRA) Eminent Scholar in Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics, and he also holds appointments in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech and in neurology and psychiatry at Emory University School of Medicine. His research is focused on developing new ways to analyze and use complex brain imaging data by drawing on advanced machine-learning approaches.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

LED Lighting Development Wins 2021 Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

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Nick Holonyak Jr., Isamu Akasaki, M. George Craford, Russell Dupuis, and Shuji Nakamura awarded the world’s most prestigious engineering accolade

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The 2021 QEPrize is awarded for the creation and development of LED lighting, which forms the basis of all solid-state lighting technology. Russell Dupuis, of the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, was recognized with his colleagues Nick Holonyak Jr., Isamu Akasaki, M. George Craford, and Shuji Nakamura, for not only for the global impact of LED and solid-state lighting, but also for the tremendous contribution the LED technology has made, and will continue to make, to reducing energy consumption and addressing climate change.

First awarded in 2013 in the name of Her Majesty The Queen, the QEPrize exists to celebrate ground-breaking innovation in engineering. The 2021 winners were announced on February 2 by Lord Browne of Madingley, Chairman of the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering Foundation. HRH The Princess Royal shared a message of congratulation for the winners.

Solid-state lighting technology has changed how we illuminate our world. It can be found everywhere from sports stadiums, parking garages, inside and outside commercial buildings, homes, digital displays and computer screens and cell phones to hand-held laser pointers, automobile headlights and traffic lights. Today’s high-performance LEDs are used in efficient solid-state lighting products across the world and are contributing to the sustainable development of world economies by reducing energy consumption.  

Visible LEDs are now a global industry predicted to be worth over $108 billion by 2025 through low-cost, high-efficiency lighting. They are playing a crucial role in reducing carbon dioxide emissions, consuming significantly less energy and producing 90% less heat than incandescent lighting, and their large-scale use reduces the energy demand required to cool buildings. For this, they are often referred to as the ‘green revolution’ within lighting.

“Engineering is imperative to solving human problems. All over the world, everyone knows the QEPrize. Most importantly, this is a team prize. I was able to do what I did in the 1980s, because of what had come before. When I was modifying reactors every morning and every afternoon continuously for a year and a half, I never thought it would be so successful." Shuji Nakamura

“This is a really special moment for me. The QEPrize is so prestigious and it is spectacular to receive recognition from The Royal Family. It is a career highlight that is impossible to beat. Engineering is incredible, and I am proud to part of something that has made such a big impact on the world.” George Craford

“It is really something to share in this award with my friends and colleagues – all five of us each played an important role, and this recognition means a lot to me personally. In those early days, when we were working long days and nights hand-building reactors, Nick Holonyak mentored us. He really drew us in and inspired us to be part of the adventure that is engineering.” Russell Dupuis

“This year’s Prize winners have not only helped humanity to achieve a greater degree of mastery over the environment, they have enabled us to do so in a sustainable way. They have created a product which we now take for granted, but which will play a major role in ensuring that humanity can live in harmony with nature for many more centuries to come.” Lord Browne of Madingley, Chair, Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering Foundation

“The impact of this innovation is not to be understated. It makes lighting a lot cheaper and more accessible for emerging economies. For example, LEDs are being used on fishing boats where previously the only option would have been paraffin lamps. They are much cheaper and safer. It is not only an extreme engineering achievement, but a societal impact that has a significant impact on the environment.” Sir Christopher Snowden, Chair of the QEPrize Judging Panel

Dupuis holds the Steve W. Chaddick Endowed Chair in Electro-Optics and is a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology; Nakamura is the Cree Chair in Solid-State Lighting and Displays in the Materials Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara; Craford is a Solid-State Lighting Fellow at Philips Lumileds Lighting Company; Akasaki is a University Professor at Nagoya University and Meijo University (Japan); and Holonyak is the John Bardeen Endowed Chair Emeritus in Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

The winners will be formally honoured at a ceremony later this year; they will receive the £1 million prize and an iconic trophy, designed by the 2021 Create the Trophy winner Hannah Goldsmith, a 20-year-old design student from the United Kingdom.

 

About the 2021 QEPrize

QEPrize celebrates engineering’s visionaries, encouraging engineers to help extend the boundaries of what is possible across all disciplines and applications. It also inspires young minds to consider engineering as a career choice and to help to solve the challenges of the future.

The QEPrize is administered by the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering Foundation and funded by generous support from the following corporate donors: BAE Systems plc, BP plc, GlaxoSmithKline, Hitachi, Ltd., Jaguar Land Rover, National Grid plc, Nissan Motor Corporation, Shell UK Ltd., Siemens UK, Sony, Tata Steel Europe, Tata Consultancy Services, and Toshiba.

The 2021 winners are awarded a total cash prize of £1 million.

Contact

For more information or to request an interview, please contact Edelman at QEPrize@Edelman.com

Georgia Tech/Atlanta media contact: John Toon, 404-894-6986, john.toon@comm.gatech.edu

Jayant Named as an NAI Fellow

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Nikil Jayant received an Indian Institute of Science Distinguished Alumnus Award in December 2008.

Nikil Jayant is among the 175 renowned academic inventors named to the 2020 class of Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). 

Jayant is a professor emeritus in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE). During his career at Georgia Tech from 1998-2013, he held the John Pippin Chair in ECE and was a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar. He was also the executive director for the Georgia Center for Advanced Telecommunications Technologies and the Georgia Tech Broadband Institute. 

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional accolade bestowed to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society. Jayant is the inventor or co-inventor of 36 patents at Bell Laboratories and at Georgia Tech, including several that are incorporated in international standards or proprietary technologies for multimedia communications. His inventions have enabled today's digital communications practice in an end-to-end fashion. They teach fundamental aspects of audiovisual signal processing, such as compression, networking, and enhancement of speech, image, audio, and video information. 

The 2020 class of NAI Fellows will be inducted at the Tenth Annual Meeting of the National Academy of Inventors on June 8, 2021 in Tampa, Florida. To learn more about the 2020 class of NAI Fellows, visit the NAI website.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Coyle Tapped for SUNY-Industry Conference Award

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Edward J. Coyle presented with award at SUNY Industry Conference and Showcase

Edward J. Coyle received the “Advancing Civic Engagement and Socially Beneficial Science and Engineering” Award at the SUNY-Industry Conference and Showcase: Science and Engineering for Social Good. The conference was held June 3-5, 2018 at Stony Brook, New York. 

Conference themes included areas of critical civic and social importance: energy and environment, health, broadening participation in STEM (human resource development), education and the technological workforce, integrating STEM and the arts and humanities, infrastructure development, technology and security, social media, and data science.

Coyle took part in this conference as one of the plenary speakers and represented the Vertically Integrated Projects (VIP) Program at Georgia Tech. He was nominated for this award by David Ferguson who is a Distinguished Service Professor of Technology and Society and Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Stony Brook University and was presented the award by Samuel Stanley, the president of Stony Brook University. 

Coyle has been a member of the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) faculty since 2008. He holds the John B. Peatman Distinguished Professorship and is a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar. Coyle leads the Arbutus Center for the Integration of Research and Education and the Vertically Integrated Projects Program (VIP), which develop strategies for systemic reform of higher education in all disciplines. 

VIP unites undergraduate education and faculty research in a team-based context and involves faculty from almost all colleges at Georgia Tech and the Georgia Tech Research Institute. Undergraduate VIP students earn academic credits, while faculty and graduate students benefit from the design/discovery efforts of their teams. VIP research projects are multidisciplinary and range from robotics applications of many kinds to intelligent transportation systems to automobile design to brain trauma assessment.

Cutline for photograph (above): Edward J. Coyle is presented with the Advancing Civic Engagement and Socially Beneficial Science and Engineering” Award by David Ferguson (left) and Stony Brook University President google.comSamuel Stanley (right)

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Wolf Named Recipient of IEEE Computer Society 2019 Harry H. Goode Memorial Award

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Marilyn Wolf

Marilyn Wolf, Farmer Distinguished Chair in Embedded Computing Systems and Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar at the Georgia Institute of Technology, has been selected to receive the IEEE Computer Society 2019 Harry H. Goode Award for “contributions to embedded, hardware-software co-design, and real-time computer vision systems.” 

The Goode Award was established to recognize achievements in the information processing field which are considered either a single contribution of theory, design, or technique of outstanding significance, or the accumulation of important contributions on theory or practice over an extended time period.

Wolf was with AT&T Bell Laboratories from 1984 to 1989, after which she joined the faculty of Princeton University in 1989. While at Princeton, she directed the New Jersey Center for Multimedia Research and co-founded Verificon Corporation to commercialize smart camera technology. She joined the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering in 2007.

Wolf’s research interests include Internet-of-Things systems and edge intelligence, cyber-physical systems, embedded computing, embedded computer vision, and VLSI systems. She is the author of several texts, including Computers as Components, now in its fourth edition, and High-Performance Embedded Computing, now in its second edition.

She has received the ASEE Terman Award and IEEE Circuits and Systems Society Education Award. She is a Fellow of the IEEE and ACM and is a Golden Core Member of the IEEE Computer Society.

Wolf received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1980, 1981, and 1984 where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and Tau Beta Pi.

Wolf will receive her award at the awards dinner held on Wednesday evening, 5 June 2019 at the Hyatt Regency Coral Gables during the IEEE Computer Society Board of Governors meeting. The Goode Award consists of a bronze medal and a $2,000 honorarium and an invitation to speak at the award presentation. Learn more about the Goode Award, including a list of past recipients.

About IEEE Computer Society

The IEEE Computer Society is the world’s home for computer science, engineering, and technology. A global leader in providing access to computer science research, analysis, and information, the IEEE Computer Society offers a comprehensive array of unmatched products, services, and opportunities for individuals at all stages of their professional career. Known as the premier organization that empowers the people who drive technology, its unparalleled resources include membership, international conferences, peer-reviewed publications, a unique digital library, standards, and training programs. Visit www.computer.org for more information.

VIP Consortium Receives 2019 ABET Innovation Award

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Edward J. Coyle

The Vertically Integrated Projects (VIP) Consortium has been selected for the 2019 ABET Innovation Award “for community-building around and dissemination of the Vertically Integrated Projects model, a scalable, cost-effective approach to undergraduate research adopted by 35 colleges and universities around the world.”

The ABET Innovation Award recognizes vision and commitment that challenge the status-quo in technical education. It honors individuals, organizations, or teams that are breaking new ground by developing and implementing innovation into their ABET-accredited programs. 

According to the ABET website, true innovation is hard to define, but easy to identify. This award distinguishes programs or individuals that have brought a significant innovation to STEM education in areas like curriculum development, laboratory experiences, teaching methodologies, cross-disciplinary programs, and experiential learning–almost anything designed and proven to improve a student’s educational experience.

The Vertically Integrated Projects (VIP) Program is a transformative approach to enhancing higher education by engaging undergraduate and graduate students in ambitious, long-term, large-scale, multidisciplinary project teams that are led by faculty. In VIP, teams of undergraduate students–from various years, disciplines, and backgrounds–work with faculty and graduate students in their areas of scholarship and exploration. Undergraduate students earn academic credit for their work and have direct experience with the innovation process, while faculty and graduate students benefit from the extended efforts of their teams.  

The VIP Program at Georgia Tech is led by Edward J. Coyle, who developed the VIP concept. As of Spring 2019, there were 70 VIP teams at Georgia Tech with more than 1,100 students enrolled. While the program originated in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, students from each of the six colleges on campus participate. Student applications are currently being accepted for Fall 2019 at www.vip.gatech.edu

Under Coyle’s leadership, the VIP Program has spread to dozens of universities around the world. The VIP Consortium (www.vip-consortium.org) is an alliance of institutions that have successfully implemented the VIP Program and engage in collaborative efforts to continue to improve and disseminate the model. To date, 35 institutions across the globe have joined the VIP Consortium, and thousands of students participate in VIP programs on these campuses each semester. Each partner site adapts the model to its own unique environment, using an essential set of program elements and specialized tools for program management and assessment. 

ABET (www.abet.org) is the professional accreditation agency providing leadership and quality assurance in applied science, computing, engineering, and engineering technology education. The ABET Innovation Award is given to a nominee selected by their peers. The president of ABET annually appoints a special committee for review of nominations for this award. The Awards Committee’s recommendations are presented to the members of the Board of Delegates for concurrence.

Awards will be presented at the 2019 ABET Awards Celebration on Friday, November 1 at the Hilton in Baltimore, Maryland.

For more information about the VIP Consortium and VIP @ Georgia Tech, contact:

Edward J. Coyle                                                                                

Director, VIP @ Georgia Tech & VIP Consortium

John B. Peatman Distinguished Professor; and Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar 

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Georgia Institute of Technology                                                         

ejc@gatech.edu

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Rohatgi Honored with IIT Kanpur Distinguished Alumnus Award

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Ajeet Rohatgi

Ajeet Rohatgi has been named as a recipient of the 2019 Distinguished Alumnus Award from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kanpur, located in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. This award is the highest given by IIT Kanpur to its alumni in recognition of their achievements. Rohatgi graduated from the Institute with his bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering in 1971.

Rohatgi is a Regents’ Professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), and he holds the John H. Weitnauer, Jr. Chair in the College of Engineering and is a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar. Rohatgi was chosen for this award for his academic and entrepreneurial excellence and for his exemplary contributions in the field of renewable energy and photovoltaic (PV) technology. 

With a career spanning 34 years at Georgia Tech, Rohatgi has built a top-notch photovoltaics (PV) program where none previously existed with the establishment of the University Center of Excellence for Photovoltaics Research and Education in 1992. He and his team have produced several world-record, high-efficiency solar cells. 

In 1996, Rohatgi’s research group designed and built the world’s largest (at the time) rooftop PV system for the Olympic Natatorium on the Georgia Tech campus. The system is still in operation today for the campus swimming and diving center. He also founded Suniva, Inc., a company known for its research, development, and manufacturing of high-efficiency crystalline solar cells. 

Rohatgi has been internationally recognized for his excellence in research, education, commercialization efforts, and professional society leadership in the PV and energy arenas. He is an IEEE Fellow and has published over 500 technical papers and has been issued 41 patents. Prior to his arrival at Georgia Tech, he was named a Westinghouse Fellow in 1984 for his achievements in the design and development of high-efficiency silicon solar cells. 

In 1996, Rohatgi received the Georgia Tech Distinguished Professor Award for excellence in teaching, research, and service. He received the prestigious IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference William Cherry Award and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory/Department of Energy Rappaport Award in 2003 for his outstanding contributions to the field of photovoltaics. In 2009, he received the Environmental Protection Agency Climate Protection Award, and the American Solar Energy Society Hoyt Clark Hottel Award for outstanding educator and innovator in the field of photovoltaics.

In 2009, Rohatgi was asked to join a delegation of clean technology entrepreneurs at the White House in support of President Barack Obama’s efforts to increase R&D funding in this area. He was also named a Champion of PV by Renewable Energy World magazine. In 2015, he was inducted as a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors.

Dupuis Honored with Materials Today Innovation Award

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Materials Today Innovation Award Winner Russell Dupuis (center) with the Editors-in-Chief of Materials Today, Jun Lou (Rice University, left) and Gleb Yushin (also of Georgia Tech, right)

Russell D. Dupuis has been honored with the Materials Today Innovation Award. He was presented with the award at the 2019 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting and Exhibit, held December 1-6 in Boston, Massachusetts. Dupuis holds the Steve W. Chaddick Endowed Chair in Electro-Optics and is a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

Dupuis was specifically recognized “for pioneering development of the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technology and seminal contributions to compound semiconductor materials and devices, including the first MOCVD III-V compound semiconductor solar cells, and advances in quantum-well semiconductor light emitters used in telecommunications and visible LEDs (light-emitting diodes).” 

Dupuis’ contributions to the development of MOCVD are among the most significant contributions made in the growth of semiconductor devices in the last 40 years. His work on the understanding and improvement of the MOCVD process was the key development that led to the demonstration of the first MOCVD-grown III-V compound semiconductor heterostructure solar cells, injection lasers, the first CW room-temperature quantum-well lasers grown by any materials technology, and the demonstration of high-reliability MOCVD lasers. These important achievements have had a great impact the efficient use of energy in the world.

Dupuis has been a member of the Georgia Tech ECE faculty since 2003. Prior to his arrival at Tech, he was a chaired professor at the University of Texas at Austin and worked at Texas Instruments, Rockwell International, and AT&T Bell Laboratories. 

In 2015, Dupuis was one of five pioneers to receive the Draper Prize for Engineering in recognition of the significant benefit to society created by the initial development and commercialization of LED technologies. He has also been recognized with the IEEE Edison Medal and as a Fellow of the IEEE, OSA, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science for his achievements in this field.

Three Georgia Tech Faculty Named IEEE Fellows

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Stanislav Emelianov
Richard Fujimoto
Vivek Sarkar

Georgia Tech faculty members Stanislav Emelianov, Richard Fujimoto, and Vivek Sarkar have been named IEEE Fellows, the society’s highest grade of membership, effective January 1, 2020. A distinction conferred by the IEEE Board of Directors, it is considered by the technical community to be a prestigious honor and an important career achievement.

Emelianov was recognized for his contributions to ultrasound elasticity and photoacoustic imaging. He is the Joseph M. Pettit Chair Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar. An expert in biomedical imaging instrumentation and nanoagents for imaging and therapy, Emelianov has joint appointments with the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University. He is also a professor of Radiology at the Emory University School of Medicine and is affiliated with Winship Cancer Institute and other clinical units. 

Emelianov is the director of the Ultrasound Imaging and Therapeutics Research Laboratory, where his group works on the discovery, development, and clinical translation of diagnostic imaging and therapeutic instrumentation, augmented with theranostic nanoagents–small particles that can diagnose and then treat a specific disease. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and he has served as vice president for Ultrasonics of the IEEE Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control Society.

Fujimoto, a Regents’ Professor in the School of Computational Science and Engineering, was honored for his work in the field of parallel and distributed discrete event simulation. Discrete event simulations model operations within a system and have uses in a wide variety of applications. Fujimoto has authored and co-authored hundreds of technical papers on the subject as well as several books, which span application areas including transportation systems, telecommunication networks, and multiprocessor and defense systems.

He was also named a 2019 Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference (I/ITSEC) Fellow. The announcement for both of these recognitions came only two years after he was named an Association for Computing Machinery Fellow in 2017.

Sarkar, the Stephen P. Fleming Chair of Telecommunications in the School of Computer Science and co-director of the Center for Research into Novel Computing Hierarchies, received his distinction for contributions to compiler technologies for high-performance computing. His work in this area spans multiple aspects of parallel computing software including programming languages, compilers, runtime systems, and debugging and verification systems for high performance computers.

Sarkar has numerous recognitions in the field. He became a member of the IBM Academy of Technology in 1995 and an ACM Fellow in 2008. He has been serving as a member of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) since 2009 and has served on CRA’s Board of Directors since 2015. 

The IEEE – short for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers – is the world’s leading professional association for advancing technology for humanity. Through its 420,000-plus members in more than 160 countries, the association is a leading authority on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications, biomedical engineering, electric power, and consumer electronics.

Dedicated to the advancement of technology, the IEEE publishes nearly one-third of the world’s literature in the electrical and electronics engineering and computer science fields, and has developed nearly 1,300 active industry standards.  The association also sponsors or co-sponsors more than 1,900 international technical conferences and events each year. 

Three Georgia Tech Faculty Named IEEE Fellows

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Stanislav Emelianov
Richard Fujimoto
Vivek Sarkar

Georgia Tech faculty members Stanislav Emelianov, Richard Fujimoto, and Vivek Sarkar have been named IEEE Fellows, the society’s highest grade of membership, effective January 1, 2020. A distinction conferred by the IEEE Board of Directors, it is considered by the technical community to be a prestigious honor and an important career achievement.

Emelianov was recognized for his contributions to ultrasound elasticity and photoacoustic imaging. He is the Joseph M. Pettit Chair Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar. An expert in biomedical imaging instrumentation and nanoagents for imaging and therapy, Emelianov has joint appointments with the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University. He is also a professor of Radiology at the Emory University School of Medicine and is affiliated with Winship Cancer Institute and other clinical units. 

Emelianov is the director of the Ultrasound Imaging and Therapeutics Research Laboratory, where his group works on the discovery, development, and clinical translation of diagnostic imaging and therapeutic instrumentation, augmented with theranostic nanoagents–small particles that can diagnose and then treat a specific disease. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and he has served as vice president for Ultrasonics of the IEEE Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control Society.

Fujimoto, a Regents’ Professor in the School of Computational Science and Engineering, was honored for his work in the field of parallel and distributed discrete event simulation. Discrete event simulations model operations within a system and have uses in a wide variety of applications. Fujimoto has authored and co-authored hundreds of technical papers on the subject as well as several books, which span application areas including transportation systems, telecommunication networks, and multiprocessor and defense systems.

He was also named a 2019 Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference (I/ITSEC) Fellow. The announcement for both of these recognitions came only two years after he was named an Association for Computing Machinery Fellow in 2017.

Sarkar, the Stephen P. Fleming Chair of Telecommunications in the School of Computer Science and co-director of the Center for Research into Novel Computing Hierarchies, received his distinction for contributions to compiler technologies for high-performance computing. His work in this area spans multiple aspects of parallel computing software including programming languages, compilers, runtime systems, and debugging and verification systems for high performance computers.

Sarkar has numerous recognitions in the field. He became a member of the IBM Academy of Technology in 1995 and an ACM Fellow in 2008. He has been serving as a member of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) since 2009 and has served on CRA’s Board of Directors since 2015. 

The IEEE – short for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers – is the world’s leading professional association for advancing technology for humanity. Through its 420,000-plus members in more than 160 countries, the association is a leading authority on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications, biomedical engineering, electric power, and consumer electronics.

Dedicated to the advancement of technology, the IEEE publishes nearly one-third of the world’s literature in the electrical and electronics engineering and computer science fields, and has developed nearly 1,300 active industry standards.  The association also sponsors or co-sponsors more than 1,900 international technical conferences and events each year. 

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