Cressler, Romberg Honored with Prestigious IEEE Medals

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John Cressler (left) and Justin Romberg

John D. Cressler and Justin K. Romberg, both faculty members from the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), have been awarded with two of the most prestigious honors presented by the IEEE, the world’s largest technical professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for the benefit of humanity.

Cressler and Romberg were both honored with IEEE medals at the IEEE Vision, Innovation, and Challenges Summit (IEEE VIC Summit) and Honors Ceremony, held virtually May 11-13, 2021. Cressler was honored with the 2021 IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal for a career of outstanding contributions to education in the fields of interest to IEEE. Romberg was honored as a co-recipient of the 2021 IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal for outstanding contributions in signal processing.

John D. Cressler

As the recipient of the 2021 IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal, Cressler was honored “for inspirational teaching and mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students.” He was recognized with this award on May 11 by IEEE President-Elect Ray Liu.

Cressler is the third faculty member from ECE to receive this honor. Previous recipients include Ronald W. Schafer (1992) and James D. Meindl (1990, while with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute). The James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal was established in 1956 and is sponsored by Lockheed Martin, MathWorks, Pearson, and the IEEE Life Members Fund.

“This is a tremendous honor for John, and his commitment to teaching and mentoring — and to the success and well-being of our students – is a tremendous model for all of us to follow,” said Magnus Egerstedt, Steve W. Chaddick School Chair and Professor in ECE.

Cressler is the Schlumberger Chair Professor in Electronics and the Ken Byers Teaching Fellow in Science and Religion at Georgia Tech. He has been the associate director of the Georgia Electronic Design Center since 2015. Cressler joined the Georgia Tech ECE faculty in 2002 after spending a decade as a faculty member in the Department of ECE at Auburn University. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in applied physics at Columbia University and his B.S. degree in physics from Georgia Tech in 1984.

Cressler couples his passions for teaching and mentoring with being the leader of one of the largest, most visible, and most productive silicon-germanium (SiGe) research groups in the world. He and his colleagues have written over 700 refereed journal and conference papers, and he has graduated over 100 Ph.D. and master’s students who are now leaders in the electronics industry, academia, and government and research labs or who have started their own successful companies.

Cressler is a mainstay in the microelectronics instructional program in ECE and has introduced first-of-a-kind courses – CoE 3002 Introduction to the Microelectronics and Nanotechnology Revolution and ECE 6444 Silicon-based Heterostructure Devices and Circuits – that use textbooks that he has written and that have been adopted by other universities around the world. He also teaches IAC 2002 Science, Engineering, and Religion: An Interfaith Dialogue in the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts. This course is open to undergraduate students of all years and majors and has always been positively received by the students.

Cressler has received many top teaching and mentoring awards from Georgia Tech and from IEEE and Eta Kappa Nu. His goal for his Ph.D. students is to fall in love with research, while maintaining a good work-life balance, and to provide a safe place to fail and to be creative and innovative. In the classroom, Cressler believes that the keys to success are passion for what you teach, being real, being and sharing who you are and what you believe with your students, and being approachable and showing that you care.

Cressler said that teaching is his life and vocation, and he counts teaching and mentoring as his great passion in the classroom, lab, and life. “My accomplishments are best measured by the success of my students,” Cressler said. “Receiving an award for teaching and mentoring, which is something very close to my heart, means a great deal to me.”

To view Cressler’s award presentation from the IEEE VIC Summit and Honors Ceremony, please visit https://ieeetv.ieee.org/channels/communities/awards-hall-c-day-1-ieee-vic-summit-and-honors-ceremony. His presentation starts at the 6:40 mark.

Justin K. Romberg

As a co-recipient of the 2021 IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal, Romberg was honored “for groundbreaking contributions to compressed sensing.” He received this medal with his colleagues, Emmanuel Candes, who holds The Barnum-Simons Chair in Mathematics and Statistics at Stanford University, and Terence Tao, a professor of mathematics at the University of California at Los Angeles.

Romberg and his colleagues were recognized with this award on May 12 by IEEE President-Elect Liu. He is the fourth faculty member from ECE to receive this honor. Previous recipients include Thomas P. Barnwell (2014), Ronald W. Schafer (2010), and James H. McClellan (2004). The IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal was established in 1995 and is sponsored by the Kilby Medal Fund.

“This is a tremendous honor for Justin, and our amazing faculty track record in receiving this award speaks of the high regard in which our digital signal processing program is held around the world,” said Egerstedt.

Romberg holds the Schlumberger Professorship and is the associate chair for Research in ECE. He is also the senior director for the Center for Machine Learning at Georgia Tech. Romberg joined the ECE faculty in 2006 after working as a postdoctoral scholar in Applied and Computational Mathematics at Caltech for three years. He received his B.S.E.E., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Rice University in 1997, 1999, and 2004, respectively.

Romberg, Candes, and Tao were recognized for their 2006 paper, “Robust Uncertainty Principles: Exact Reconstruction from Highly Incomplete Frequency Information,” which demonstrated that structured signal samples could be reconstructed perfectly from very few samples. The paper established the field of compressed sensing, which is considered one of the most important developments in signal processing in the last 50 years.

This paper spurred a flurry of research activities, with engineers and scientists exploring ways to use compressed sensing in a variety of applications. Compressed sensing has been used in wireless sensor networks, more efficient data aggregation, and improved data recovery, and has resulted in energy-efficient network routing protocols, reduced data transmission requirements, and improved network security.

Compressed sensing has even been used in astrological imaging and medical imaging. The first images of black holes from the Event Horizon Telescope were based on compressed sensing reconstruction methods. However, the greatest success of compressed sensing can be found in MRI imaging, where the technology is used to shorten the imaging process drastically without losing image quality.

Romberg said that one of the best things about the work in compressed sensing is how it has introduced him to ideas and people in many different areas of applied mathematics, such as harmonic analysis, optimization, and applied probability and statistical learning.

“It has been extremely rewarding to be exposed to new ideas from these fields by interacting with researchers on a common problem set,” Romberg said. “It has also been a pleasure to see how this early work was translated into different problem domains and built a strong foundation for me across disciplinary research, which is something that I have valued throughout my career.”

To view Romberg’s award presentation from the IEEE VIC Summit and Honors Ceremony, please visit https://ieeetv.ieee.org/channels/communities/awards-hall-a-day-2-ieee-vic-summit-and-honors-ceremony. His presentation starts at the 4:55 mark.

Zajic Appointed as a Ken Byers Professor

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Alenka Zajic has been appointed as a Ken Byers Professor, effective October 1, 2020. Zajic is a member of the faculty at the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), where she currently holds the rank of associate professor.  

After graduating from Georgia Tech with her Ph.D. in 2008, Zajic spent a year as a postdoctoral fellow at the Naval Research Laboratory and two years as a visiting assistant professor in Tech's School of Computer Science. In 2012, she joined ECE as an assistant professor, and in 2017, she was promoted to associate professor. 

Zajic leads the Electromagnetic Measurements in Communications and Computing Laboratory, where she advises 10 Ph.D. students and two postdoctoral fellows who work in the areas of propagation, enabling communication, and improving data security in challenging environments, such as vehicle-to-vehicle wireless radio communications, underwater acoustic communications, and communications inside a processor chip. To date, Zajic has graduated nine Ph.D. students and five M.S. students. She advises undergraduate students on individual projects and through the Opportunity Research Scholars Program. Zajic and her research group have received six best paper, poster, or demonstration awards since she joined ECE as a faculty member.

Zajic’s specific research interests focus on understanding mechanisms that generate electromagnetic (EM) side-channel emanations in modern computers and on locating sources of information-carrying EM emanations in complex environments. She has received over $18 million in research funding as a PI or co-PI, mostly from NSF, DARPA, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Zajic has published over 140 refereed journal and conference publications. She has three awarded patents and five patent applications pending. Her work has been publicized locally and internationally through The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, NSF Science 360, Voice of America, Wired, and many other outlets. Zajic has served as an editor of the IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications and Wiley Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies. She also served as the chair of the Atlanta chapter of the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society/Antennas and Propagation Society from 2015-2017, and during that time, the group received the IEEE Outstanding Chapter Award in 2016. She received the IEEE Atlanta Section Outstanding Engineer Award in 2019. 

Equally devoted to teaching excellence and service, Zajic has developed or redesigned both undergraduate and graduate courses and has taught a flipped classroom version of ECE 3025–Electromagnetics. For her efforts, she has received several teaching awards, including the Richard M. Bass/Eta Kappa Nu Outstanding Junior Teacher Award in 2016 and the LexisNexis Dean’s Excellence Award in 2016-2017. Zajic has also participated in the Center for Teaching and Learning’s Class of 1969 Teaching Scholars Program. She is an active member of the ECE and Georgia Tech community, currently serving as the director of the M.S. Cybersecurity degree program; a member of the ECE Statutory Advisory Committee; a member of the College of Engineering Reappointment, Promotion, and Tenure committee; and a member of a working group on the professional development of graduate students, an initiative coordinated from the Provost’s Office.

Stüber Selected for IEEE Communications Society RCC Award

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Gordon Stüber

Gordon L. Stüber has been named the recipient of the 2017 IEEE Communications Society Radio Communications Committee (RCC) Technical Recognition Award. The award will be presented at the next RCC meeting, which will be held during IEEE GLOBECOM 2017 on December 4-8 in Singapore.

The RCC Technical Recognition Award aims to promote radio communications research and development activities in both academia and industry. 

Stüber has been on the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) faculty since 1986 and currently holds the Joseph M. Pettit Chair Professorship. He leads the research of the Wireless Systems Laboratory, which focuses on physical layer wireless communications and communication signal processing.

Stüber has published over 300 refereed journal and conference papers in these areas and has graduated 32 Ph.D. students. He is also the author of the textbook, Principles of Wireless Communications, 4/e, 2017. Stüber has served as an elected Member-at-Large on the IEEE Communication Society Board of Governors, and is currently an elected Member of the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society Board of Governors, where he serves as the Awards Committee Chair. 

Weitnauer Receives Radio Club of America Award

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Mary Ann Weitnauer has been named the recipient of the Vivian A. Carr Award, which will be presented by the Radio Club of America (RCA) at its 108th Banquet and Awards Presentation on November 17 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The Vivian A. Carr Award recognizes outstanding achievements by a woman in the wireless industry, and the award’s namesake was a senior executive at Bell Labs and the first female member of the RCA, which is the world’s oldest wireless organization.  

A member of the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) faculty since 1989 and ECE’s Senior Associate Chair, Weitnauer leads the Smart Antenna Research Laboratory (SARL), which performs both experimental and theoretical studies. Her research since the mid 1990s has been focused on the lower three layers of MIMO wireless networks that have virtual or distributed antenna arrays, with emphasis on wireless LAN, ad hoc, mesh, and sensor networks.

Recent SARL activities include synchronization for distributed or virtual arrays, nonlinear precoding and interference alignment for wireless LANS with distributed MIMO access points, modeling the residual from interference cancellation, distributed array-based network time synchronization, and millimeter wave communications.

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Atlanta, GA

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jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

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Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Four Georgia Tech Faculty Named IEEE Fellows

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Jaydev Desai
Four Georgia Tech faculty members were named IEEE Fellows, effective January 1, 2018. They are Jaydev Desai, a professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME); Saibal Mukhopadhyay and Justin Romberg, both professors in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE); and Kevin James “Jim” Sangston, a senior research engineer in the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI).
Saibal Mukhopadhyay has been an assistant professor in ECE since 2007.
Kevin James "Jim" Sangston

Four Georgia Tech faculty members were named IEEE Fellows, effective January 1, 2018. They are Jaydev Desai, a professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME); Saibal Mukhopadhyay and Justin Romberg, both professors in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE); and Kevin James “Jim” Sangston, a senior research engineer in the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI).

The IEEE Grade of Fellow is conferred by the IEEE Board of Directors upon a person with an outstanding record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. IEEE Fellow is the highest grade of membership and is recognized by the technical community as a prestigious honor and an important career achievement.

Desai is being recognized “for contributions to medical and swarm robotics.” A BME faculty member since 2016, he also serves as associate director of the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines and as director of the newly launched Georgia Center for Medical Robotics. Desai’s research interests are primarily in image-guided surgical robotics, cancer diagnosis at the micro-scale, and rehabilitation robotics. Before joining Georgia Tech, Desai was a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Mukhopadhyay is being recognized “for contributions to energy-efficient and robust computing systems design.” An ECE faculty member since 2007, he leads the Gigascale Reliable Energy Efficient Nanosystem (GREEN) Lab, where he and his current team of 12 Ph.D. students develop smart machines that are able to generate usable information from real-time data for diverse applications - from self-powered sensors to mobile phones to high-performance servers. Mukhopadhyay’s team explores algorithmic principles to make these systems energy-efficient, robust, and secure, and pursue their experimental demonstration in silicon. 

Romberg is being recognized “for contributions to compressive sensing.” An ECE faculty member since 2006, he is the School’s associate chair for Research and holds the Schlumberger Professorship. In addition, Romberg serves as associate director for the Center for Machine Learning. He conducts research that is on the interface between signal processing, applied harmonic analysis, and optimization. Romberg and his current team of six Ph.D. students are interested in both the mathematical theory and real-world implementation of algorithms to make difficult processing tasks much easier.

Sangston is being recognized “for contributions to coherent detection of radar signals in clutter.” He initially came to GTRI from the U.S Naval Research Laboratory in 1996. His research in target detection in difficult clutter environments from the mid-1990s up till the present time has been a fruitful source of ideas and motivation for many investigators pursuing advanced research on radar target detection problems throughout the world. He currently works in the Sensors and Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory (SEAL), where he conducts research that seeks to combine advanced geometric and algebraic ideas to solve challenging radar signal processing problems. 

The IEEE is the world’s leading professional association for advancing technology for humanity. Through its 400,000-plus members in 160 countries, the association is a leading authority on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power, and consumer electronics.

Dedicated to the advancement of technology, the IEEE publishes 30 percent of the world’s literature in the electrical and electronics engineering and computer science fields, and has developed more than 1,300 active industry standards.  The association also sponsors or co-sponsors nearly 1,700 international technical conferences each year.  To learn more about IEEE or the IEEE Fellow Program, please visit www.ieee.org.

Georgia Tech’s Center for Co-design of Chip, Package System (C3PS) partners with Notre Dame in $26 million multi-university research center developing next-generation computing technologies

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John Pippin Chair in Microsystems Packaging & Electromagnetics in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and Director of the Center for Co-Design of Chip, Package, System (C3PS), Georgia Tech.
Associate Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology

In today’s era of big data, cloud computing, and Internet of Things devices, information is produced and shared on a scale that challenges the current processing speeds and energy load demands placed on electronics devices. These challenges are only set to expand, as the ability to create and store data increases in magnitude over the next decade.

With these computing challenges in mind, the Semiconductor Research Corporation's (SRC) Joint University Microelectronics Program (JUMP), which represents a consortium of industrial participants and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), has established a new $26 million center called the Applications and Systems-driven Center for Energy-Efficient integrated Nano Technologies (ASCENT).

Georgia Tech’s Center for Co-design of Chip, Package System (C3PS) led by Profs. A. Raychowdhury and M. Swaminathan, deputy director and director, respectively, both from the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and with support from the Institute of Electronics and Nanotechnology, headed-up Georgia Tech’s winning proposal that resulted in a 5 year, $3.5M award that will fund up to 10 GRA positions.

The multidisciplinary, multi-university center will focus on conducting research that aims to increase the performance, efficiency and capabilities of future computing systems for both commercial and defense applications. By going beyond current industry approaches, such as two dimensional scaling and the addition of performance boosters to complementary metal oxide semiconductors, or CMOS technology, the GT team seeks to provide enhanced performance and energy consumption at lower costs.

Profs. Raychowdhury (PI) and Swaminathan (co-PI) will work in the area of heterogeneous integration, with a focus on the design of high speed die-to-die networks, the incorporation of power, logic, memory and RF components on a common substrate that enables 2.5D and 3D integration.

“Our involvement in the ASCENT center provides us with unique opportunities to partner with the academic and industrial leaders to explore foundational technologies in computing. We will leverage our expertise on high-speed circuit design, device-circuit interactions and advanced packaging to address logic and memory challenges for next-generation computing and communication systems,” said Prof. Raychowdhury, the ON Semiconductor Jr. Associate Professor of VLSI Systems.

“Georgia Tech has always had a long history of working with SRC and we are therefore excited and honored to continue that effort through JUMP,” said Prof. M. Swaminathan, John Pippin Chair in Microsystems Packaging & Electromagnetics and C3PS director. “Through JUMP we plan on expanding our current center capabilities on power delivery, machine learning, multi-physics simulation and system design to include new circuit architectures, power converters, magnetic materials, high frequency components, vertically integrated tools and other platform technologies on a common interconnect fabric.”

This is one of the largest JUMP centers funded by SRC and will work synergistically over the next five years to provide breakthrough technologies.  Other universities involved in the 13-member team include; Notre Dame (lead), Arizona State University, Cornell University, Purdue University, Stanford University, University of Minnesota, University of California-Berkeley, University of California-Los Angeles, University of California-San Diego, University of California-Santa Barbara, University of Colorado, and the University of Texas-Dallas.

- Christa M. Ernst

Wang Tapped for DARPA Young Faculty Award

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Hua Wang has received a DARPA Young Faculty Award (YFA) for his research on mm-Wave power amplifiers with extreme bandwidth and energy efficiency.

A member of the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering faculty since 2012, Wang holds the Demetrius T. Paris Junior Professorship and leads the Georgia Tech Electronics and Micro-System (GEMS) Lab. He has also received multiple prestigious academic awards, including the IEEE MTT-S Outstanding Young Engineer Award in 2017, Georgia Tech Sigma Xi Young Faculty Award in 2016, National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award in 2015, Roger P. Webb ECE Outstanding Junior Faculty Member Award in 2015, and Lockheed Dean’s Excellence in Teaching Award in 2015, as well as many best paper awards in the field of solid-state circuits, systems, and microwave engineering. Wang is also a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society for 2018 and 2019.

As millimeter-wave frequency applications have become prevalent in the commercial and Department of Defense markets, there is a rapidly growing need for advanced millimeter-wave solid-state power amplifier technologies that can support high energy efficiency, sufficient output power, and high-speed complex modulations. Moreover, high-efficiency amplifiers covering extremely wide bandwidth have become a necessity, particularly for frequency-agile massive Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output (MIMO) systems, such as multi-standard 5G wireless communication.

In this project, Wang will lead the fundamental research on a completely new class of extremely-wideband-yet-efficient power amplifiers over the frequency range of 30-100GHz. The key technology innovations include novel amplifier circuit topologies, hybrid use of silicon/non-silicon solid-state devices, and multi-mode amplifier operations.

This project will potentially achieve a new class of load modulation power amplifiers with an unprecedented combination of bandwidth, energy efficiency, and output power. Such amplifier technologies will eventually enable true “common-module front-ends” for reconfigurable transmitters and MIMO systems with "full-spectrum access" and digital beam-forming for wireless communication, radar, imaging, and spectrum sensing applications.

Wang Appointed as IEEE SSCS Distinguished Lecturer

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Hua Wang has been named as a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society for a two-year term, effective January 1, 2018 through December 31, 2019. He is an assistant professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

Wang leads the Georgia Tech Electronics and Micro-System (GEMS) lab, which focuses on innovating integrated circuits and hybrid micro-systems to address future wireless communication, radar, imaging, and health care applications.

The three areas in which Wang will present lectures include:

• Broadband, Linear, and High-Efficiency Mm-Wave Power Amplifiers – The Unreasonable Quest for “Perfect” 5G Mm-Wave Power Amplifiers and Some Reasonable Solutions

• Merging Antenna Designs with Electronic Circuits – Multi-Feed Antennas Based Mm-Wave Front-Ends in Silicon for On-Antenna Power Combining, Active Load Modulation, and Full Duplex Operations

• Using Moore’s Law to Break Eroom’s Law? – Multimodal CMOS Cellular Interface for High Throughput Drug Screening and New Drug Development

A member of the ECE faculty since 2012, Wang holds the Demetrius T. Paris Junior Professorship. Some of his most recent awards include the DARPA Young Faculty Award (2018); IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society Outstanding Young Engineer Award (2017); Georgia Tech Sigma Xi Young Faculty Award (2016); and the NSF CAREER Award, Lockheed Dean’s Excellence in Teaching Award, and Georgia Tech ECE Outstanding Junior Faculty Member Award (all received in 2015).

Wang is an associate editor of the IEEE Microwave and Wireless Components Letters and serves as a technical program committee and steering committee member for the top conferences in his field. He serves as the chair of Atlanta’s IEEE Circuits and Systems Society/Solid-State Circuits Society (SSCS) joint chapter, which won the IEEE SSCS Outstanding Chapter Award in 2014.

Stüber Elected to IEEE VTS Board of Governors

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Gordon Stüber

Gordon L. Stüber has been elected to the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society (VTS) Board of Governors for a remarkable, seventh consecutive three-year term. Stüber holds the Joseph M. Pettit Chair in Communications at the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

The IEEE VTS board consists of 15 elected board members that serve three-year terms. The Society's areas of interest include land transportation; railroad/mass transit; mobile communications; vehicular electrotechnology equipment and systems; and land, airborne, and maritime mobile services. 

Stüber has been on ECE faculty since 1986, where he leads the Wireless Systems Laboratory, which focuses on physical layer wireless communications and communication signal processing.

Stüber has published over 300 refereed journal and conference papers in these areas and has graduated 32 Ph.D. students. He is also the author of the textbook, Principles of Wireless Communications, 4/e, 2017. Stüber is the IEEE VTS Awards Committee Chair, and he has served as an elected Member-at-Large on the IEEE Communication Society Board of Governors.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Ansari Tapped for NSF CAREER Award

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Azadeh Ansari

Azadeh Ansari has been named as a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER Award. Ansari holds the Sutterfield Family Junior Professorship in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

The title of her award is "Radio Frequency Spectrum Sensing with a Fine-Tooth Nanomechanical Comb,” and it will start on March 1, 2020 and end on February 28, 2025. The tremendous growth of wireless devices and Internet of Things (IoT) applications has placed a great strain on the radio frequency (RF) network infrastructures, congesting the channels and overcrowding the radio frequency spectrum. 

Battery-operated smart devices, such as smartphones, wearable technologies such as smartwatches and glasses, autonomous machines, personal radars, and other smart gadgets, all compete for bandwidth and require efficient spectrum utilization. To combat the looming RF scarcity, a chip-scale, tunable multi-GHz nano-mechanical frequency comb generator is proposed that utilizes the parallelism resulting from the multiplicity of the comb teeth to perform RF spectrum sensing in a fraction of the time, in a smaller form factor, using lower power, and with far fewer circuit components than the current state-of-the-art hardware solutions.

Ansari joined the ECE faculty in August 2017 after working as a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Physics at Caltech. She is a member of the nanotechnology and the electronic design and applications technical interest groups. Her research interests are in nano/microelectromechanical systems (N/MEMS), nonlinear mechanical frequency combs, radio frequency acoustic devices, and micro-robotics.

Ansari has published over 30 refereed journal and conference papers and has one published patent and three patent applications. She was a Center for Teaching and Learning Class of 1969 teaching fellow in Spring 2019. Ansari is the director of the Center for Muscle-Inspired Actuators for Multi-scale Robotics, an Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology-funded center for multi-disciplinary research.

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