Six Georgia Tech Faculty Named IEEE Fellows

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2022 IEEE Fellows. Top row (l-r): Ghassan AlRegib, Levent Degertekin, Bonnie Ferri. Bottom row (l-r): Arijit Raychowdhury, Maryam Saeedifard, May Dongmei Wang.  

Six Georgia Tech faculty members were named IEEE Fellows, effective January 1, 2022. They are Ghassan AlRegib, Bonnie Ferri, Arijit Raychowdhury, and Maryam Saeedifard, professors in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE); Levent Degertekin, professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering; and May Dongmei Wang, a professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME) at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

The IEEE Grade of Fellow is conferred by the IEEE Board of Directors upon a person with an outstanding record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. IEEE Fellow is the highest grade of membership and is recognized by the technical community as a prestigious honor and an important career achievement.

AlRegib is being recognized “for contributions to perception-based and context-based visual signal processing.” He has been an ECE faculty member since 2003 and is a Georgia Tech ECE Ph.D. alumnus. AlRegib holds the John and Marilu McCarty Chair Professorship and is the director of the Center for Energy and Geo Processing and the Omni Lab for Intelligent Visual Engineering and Science. He and his team of nine Ph.D. students work on robust and interpretable machine learning algorithms and systems for a wide range of applications such as autonomous systems, medical imaging, medication development, and subsurface imaging. They are interested in advancing the fundamentals and deployment of these systems in real-world scenarios. AlRegib was the technical program co-chair for the International Conference on Image Processing 2020 and GlobalSIP 2014. He served two terms on two IEEE Signal Processing Society Technical Committees–Multimedia Signal Processing and Image, Video, and Multidimensional Signal Processing. AlRegib is an editorial board member for the IEEE Transactions on Image Processing and the Elsevier Journal Signal Processing: Image Communications. In 2017, he led a team that was selected to organize the inaugural IEEE Video and Image Processing Cup.

Degertekin is being recognized “for contributions to micromachined ultrasonic and optomechanical transducers and systems.” He holds the G.W. Woodruff Chair in Mechanical Systems and joined Georgia Tech in 2000 as an assistant professor. Degertekin leads the Micromachined Sensors & Transducers Group and advises six Ph.D. and master’s students in mechanical engineering and electrical engineering. He also advises three postdoctoral scholars/visiting researchers. Degertekin’s current projects include acousto-optical sensors for safer interventional and diagnostic MRI procedures, wireless intracranial ultrasound imaging systems, capacitive parametric ultrasound transducers (CPUTs) for wireless energy transfer and sensing, capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) systems for Transcranial Focused Ultrasound-based drug delivery in the brain, and intravascular ultrasound imaging system development. He also has served as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control and IEEE Sensors Journal.

Ferri is being recognized “for contributions to hands-on learning and leadership in higher education.” She has been a professor in ECE since 1988 and served as the School’s associate chair for Undergraduate Affairs and associate chair for Graduate Affairs. Ferri is now the vice provost for Graduate Education at Georgia Tech, a post she has held since 2017. She has previously been recognized for her work in educational innovation and scholarship through the IEEE Undergraduate Teaching Award and the Regents Award for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. In addition to educational research, Ferri performs research in the area of systems and controls and is a proud Ph.D. electrical engineering alumna of Georgia Tech. She currently serves as the general chair of the 2022 American Control Conference, to be held June 8-10 in Atlanta. The conference is co-sponsored by the IEEE Control Systems Society. 

Raychowdhury is being recognized “for contributions to energy-efficient adaptive integrated circuit design.” An ECE faculty member since 2013, he is the Steve W. Chaddick School Chair and leads the Integrated Circuits and Systems Research Lab, where he and his team of three postdoctoral researchers and 13 Ph.D. students work in the broad area of design and application of heterogeneous technologies in digital and mixed signal circuits and systems. They particularly emphasize work in design of on-chip sensors, machine-learning classifiers, neuromorphic hardware, on-die voltage regulators and power converters, and dense memories and logic for low power, resilient, and adaptive systems. Raychowdhury is a mentor for IEEE Young Professionals and Women in Circuits and is a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Solid State Circuits Society. He has served on the technical program committees of 16 IEEE conferences in the last five years. Raychowdhury is the technical program chair for the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference 2022, and he served as the technical program chair of the IEEE International Conference on Artificial Intelligence Circuits and Systems in 2021.

Saeedifard is being recognized “for contributions to modulation, control, and protection of multilevel converters for high-voltage DC transmission.” An ECE faculty member since 2014, she currently holds the Dean’s Professorship, which is housed in the College of Engineering. Saeedifard leads the Advanced Power Electronics Lab, where she and her current team of nine Ph.D. students work on modeling, control, cyber-physical protection, and application of various power electronics systems for efficient and secure integration, transmission, and utilization of renewable energy systems, as well as vehicular electrification. Saeedifard has been previously recognized with the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society J. David Irwin Early Career Award and the IEEE Region 3 Outstanding Engineer Award. She is currently serving as the co-editor-in-chief of the IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics

Wang is being recognized “for contributions to biomedical informatics and AI.” She earned her doctorate in ECE from Georgia Tech, and is a Wallace H. Coulter Faculty Fellow and a Georgia Distinguished Cancer Scholar in the Coulter Department. Wang has been a member of the BME faculty since 2002 after working at Lucent Technologies Bell Labs, and currently advises more than 20 trainees in the Bio-Medical Informatics and Bio-Imaging Laboratory (Bio-MIBLab), including one NIH K23 Scholar and 10 thesis students at all levels from BME, ECE, computational science and engineering, and biology, along with Ph.D. students in bioinformatics, machine learning, and the Coulter Department M.D./Ph.D. program. Her research focuses on biomedical big data analytics and artificial intelligence, particularly biomedical and health informatics for predictive, personalized, and precision health. Wang was recently elected chair of the Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, and Biomedical Informatics (ACM SIGBio) and as vice president-elect of conferences for the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. She is a Kavli Fellow, an American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering Fellow, and an International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering Fellow.

In addition to the six Georgia Tech faculty members named as IEEE Fellows, three ECE alumni were also elevated to Fellow status. They are M. Brian Blake, Apurva Mody, and Anh-Vu Pham. Blake, who is the president of Georgia State University, was recognized “for contributions to web-based software engineering.” Mody, who is the founder and CEO of AiRANACULUS, was recognized “for leadership in cognitive dynamic spectrum sharing and standards.” Pham, who is a professor in the Department of ECE at the University of California, Davis, was recognized “for contributions to organic packaging technologies."

The IEEE is the world’s leading professional association for advancing technology for humanity. IEEE and its members inspire a global community through its highly cited publications, conferences, technology standards, and professional and educational activities. Through its 400,000-plus members in more than 160 countries, the association is a leading authority on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power, and consumer electronics.

Dedicated to the advancement of technology, the IEEE publishes 30 percent of the world’s literature in the electrical engineering, computer science, and electronics fields, and has developed a portfolio of nearly 1,200 standards and more than 900 projects under development. The association also sponsors more than 1,600 annual conferences and events worldwide. The IEEE has almost 3,500 student branches at colleges and universities in over 100 countries. To learn more about IEEE or the IEEE Fellow Program, please visit www.ieee.org.

Dupuis Selected as Benjamin Franklin Medal Recipient

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Russell Dupuis

Russell Dupuis has been named as a co-recipient of the 2022 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Electrical Engineering. He and his fellow laureates will be honored for their achievements during The Franklin Institute Awards Week, to be held May 2-5, 2022 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Now in its 197th year, The Franklin Institute Awards Program pays tribute to its namesake and America’s first citizen scientist, Benjamin Franklin, by honoring 13 individuals for their extraordinary achievements in science, engineering, and business leadership. This awards program is the oldest comprehensive science and technology awards program in the United States and has recognized more than 2,000 of the most pioneering scientists, engineers, inventors, and innovators from across the globe.

Dupuis is being honored for pioneering the technology known as MOCVD (metalorganic chemical vapor deposition). This technology provides the materials quality and ultra-precision required for many device components central to modern life, including LEDS, transistors, lasers, and high-performance solar cells. 

His contributions to the development of MOCVD are among the most significant contributions made in the growth of semiconductor devices in the last 40 years. His work on the understanding and improvement of the MOCVD process was the key development that led to the demonstration of the first MOCVD-grown III-V compound semiconductor heterostructure solar cells, injection lasers, the first CW room-temperature quantum-well lasers grown by any materials technology, and the demonstration of high-reliability MOCVD lasers. These important achievements have had a great impact on the efficient use of energy in the world.

Dupuis has been a faculty member in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at Georgia Tech since 2003. He holds the Steve W. Chaddick Endowed Chair in Electro-Optics and is a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar. Dupuis also leads the Center for Compound Semiconductors. Prior to his arrival at Tech, he was a chaired professor at the University of Texas at Austin and worked at Texas Instruments, Rockwell International, and AT&T Bell Laboratories.

Dupuis has received several major honors in the last six years. Earlier this year, he and four of his colleagues were awarded the 2021 Queen Elizabeth Prize in Engineering for the creation and development of LED lighting. In 2019, Dupuis was honored with the Materials Today Innovation Award for his development of the MOCVD technology and seminal contributions to compound semiconductor materials and devices. In 2015, he was one of five pioneers to receive the Draper Prize for Engineering in recognition of the significant benefit to society created by the initial development and commercialization of LED technologies. 

Dupuis has also been recognized with the IEEE Edison Medal and as a Fellow of the IEEE, OSA, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Writing and Communication Program at Georgia Tech Awarded Certificate of Excellence

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The Writing and Communication Program (WCP), a unit in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication (LMC), was selected as one of eight recipients of the 2021-2022 Writing Program Certificate of Excellence. The award, administered by the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC), recognizes exemplary college writing programs.

“The Writing and Communication Program at Georgia Tech is defined by its effort to provide its students and faculty with innovative, human-centered perspectives at the intersection of humanities, arts, social sciences, and STEM,” the CCCC selection committee stated in a press release. “Moreover, the committee felt this was a strong innovation program comprised of award-winning educators, researchers, and students who draw on the benefits of a technologically focused research program and an impactful liberal arts experience.”

To be eligible for this award, programs must meet the following criteria:

  • Demonstrate that the program imaginatively addresses the needs and opportunities of its students, instructors, institution, and locale
  • Offer exemplary ongoing professional development for faculty of all ranks, including adjunct/contingent faculty; treat contingent faculty respectfully, humanely, and professionally
  • Use the current best practices in the field
  • Show that the program administrator (chair, director, coordinator, etc.) has academic credentials in writing
  • Use effective, ongoing assessment
  • Use effective placement procedures
  • Create appropriate class sizes
  • Model diversity and/or serve diverse communities

The writing committee for the award application included Marion L. Brittain Fellows Jeff HowardDanielle GilmanShane Snyder, and Jonathan Shelley, as well as Andy Frazee, senior academic professional and director of the WCP.

“One of my major goals as WCP executive director is to bring attention to the amazing work we do here at Georgia Tech in the hopes of raising national awareness of intentional, mission-driven teaching postdoc programs as an ethical and intellectually vibrant way of staffing a writing program,” said Melissa Ianetta, executive director of WCP and interim chair for the School of Literature, Media, and Communication. “This award goes well towards that goal.”

WCP provides approximately 5,000 students with instruction in multimodal composition, business and technical communication, and research writing for undergraduate thesis projects each year. Defining features of the WCP are the Naugle Communication Center and the Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellowship, which offers three-year, highly selective postdoctoral teaching fellowships to 35 Ph.D. recipients who wish to develop professionally and innovate in areas of teaching, research, and service.

The Certificate of Excellence is only the most recent award for the program. Previously, the WCP was recognized with the 2020 Diversity Champion Unit Award and the 2021 Regent’s Teaching Excellence Award for Department or Program.

WCP will be recognized for this latest honor during the 2022 CCCC Awards Presentation. For more information about the CCCC Writing Program Certificate of Excellence, including past winners, visit the CCCC website.

The CCCC is a constituent organization within the  National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). The Writing and Communication Program (WCP) in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication (LMC) is a unit of the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Contact

Cassidy Chreene Whittle
Communications Officer
School of Literature, Media, and Communication | School of Modern Languages
cwhittle9@gatech.edu

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Kallin Recognized for Furthering Teaching of German

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Britta Kallin, associate professor of German in the School of Modern Languages, has been awarded the 2021 Goethe‐Institut/AATG Certificate of Merit. She is one of only five educators nationally to be recognized this year.

Germany’s cultural institute, the Goethe-Institut, and the American Association of Teachers of German (AATG) jointly administer the award for achievements in furthering the teaching of German.

“I love working with our highly motivated students, who want to learn more about the world, want to go abroad, learn about other cultures, and speak another language,” said Kallin. “Being selected for this award was only possible because my colleagues and I work as a wonderful team, and because the leadership in the School of Modern Languages provides tremendous support to the faculty and the students in the German program.”

Fellow recipients of the 2021 award include Heidi Lechner, teacher of German at Libertyville High School in Libertyville, Illinois; Pamela Scholz, teacher and language school director at the German American School of Palo Alto, California; Kathryn Sederberg, assistant professor of German at Kalamazoo College in Michigan; and Mark Wagner, teacher of German at Nicolet High School in Glendale, Wisconsin.

“With their dedication to excellence in German language instruction, these award recipients promote the transatlantic friendship between the US and German‐speaking countries and foster the much-needed intercultural awareness, so their students lead successful lives in a globalized world,” said Doug Philipp, president of the American Association of Teachers of German.

The Goethe-Institut is a non-profit German cultural association that operates worldwide with 159 institutes, promoting the study of the German language abroad and encouraging international cultural exchange and relations.

Founded in 1926, the AATG is the “only individual membership organization in the United States dedicated to the teaching of the language, literature, and culture of the German-speaking countries,” with members in all 50 states and 20 countries internationally.

Kallin’s recent honors also include the Georgia Tech Serve-Learn-Sustain UN Sustainable Development Goals Faculty Fellowship in 2019, and AATG-Georgia Duden Award for Professor of the Year in 2018. She also serves as a faculty affiliate for the Atlanta Global Studies Center.

Kallin joined Georgia Tech as an assistant professor of German in 2000, after receiving her Ph.D. in German Literature from the University of Cincinnati. She advanced to associate professor in 2008. Since 2016, she has led the Weimar/Husum/Hamburg Language for Business and Technology (LBAT) summer study-abroad program as its director. In 2017, she started serving as the director of the German program. Kallin was appointed as the director of graduate studies for the School in August 2021.

Her involvement in the Atlanta German community over the last two decades includes leadership roles in the AATG-Georgia Chapter, the Metro German Group, and the Board of Directors at the German School of Atlanta. Kallin also holds active memberships in the Modern Language Association, the German Studies Association, the Austrian Studies Association, the American Association of Teachers of German, the Women in German Coalition, and the Kafka Association of America.

Kallin and her fellow 2021 AATG award recipients will be recognized at a virtual presentation hosted by the AATG on Nov. 20. The link for the awards presentation will be made available on the AATG website.

The German program in the School of Modern Languages offers a minor and three bachelor’s degrees with concentrations in German (Applied Languages and Intercultural Studies, Global Economics and Modern Languages, and International Affairs and Modern Languages), as well as two master’s degrees in Global Media and Cultures (jointly with the School of Literature, Media, and Communication) and Applied Languages and Intercultural Studies.

The School of Modern Languages is a unit of the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Contact

Cassidy Chreene Whittle
Communications Officer
School of Literature, Media, and Communication | School of Modern Languages
cwhittle9@gatech.edu

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Yu Appointed as IEEE EDS Distinguished Lecturer

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Shimeng Yu

Shimeng Yu has been named as a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Electron Devices Society (EDS) for at least a two-year period. Yu is an associate professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, where he leads the Laboratory for Emerging Devices and Circuits. 

During his term as an IEEE EDS Distinguished Lecturer, Yu will speak on “memory device technologies for neuro-inspired computing.” These emerging semiconductor devices may serve as artificial synaptic or neuronal elements to implement neural networks in hardware, thus improving the compute/energy efficiency of artificial intelligence/machine learning and neuromorphic algorithms/workloads. These technologies may have potential impacts on smart sensing and edge platforms.

Yu has had a long association with IEEE EDS. He has received several awards from the Society over the years, including the IEEE EDS M.S. Student Fellowship in 2010, the IEEE EDS Ph.D. Student Fellowship in 2012, and the IEEE EDS Early Career Award in 2017. Yu has also worked on the technical program committees for the Society’s flagship conferences such as the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) and the IEEE Symposium on VLSI Technology. He currently serves as an editor for IEEE Electron Device Letters.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Raychowdhury Chosen for SRC Technical Excellence Award

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Arijit Raychowdhury with SRC Technical Excellence Award

Arijit Raychowdhury has been selected for the 2021 Technical Excellence Award by the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC). Raychowdhury currently holds the Motorola Solutions Foundation Professorship in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE). 

The Technical Excellence Award, first presented in 1991, is the highest technical award presented by SRC. It recognizes research of exceptional value to SRC member companies. This award recognizes key contributors of innovative technology that significantly enhance the productivity and competitiveness of the semiconductor industry. The nominations are from the industry, indicating the extent to which the research outcomes have been applied by the industry. In the history of this award, Raychowdhury is the second Georgia Tech researcher to win this award and the third person to receive this for contributions to the design of digital VLSI circuits.

A Georgia Tech ECE faculty member since 2013, Raychowdhury leads the Integrated Circuits and Systems Research Lab. He received the award for the contributions of his group in the digital linear regulator technologies for power management in Systems-on-Chips. The research conducted over the last eight years has now significantly impacted both internal research and product pathfinding in multiple SRC member companies. His nomination was supported by Intel, IBM, Qualcomm, and TSMC.

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

Krishna, Raychowdhury Win Qualcomm Faculty Awards

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Tushar Krishna (left) and Arijit Raychowdhury

Tushar Krishna and Arijit Raychowdhury have been selected for 2021 Qualcomm Faculty Awards (QFA). They are both faculty members in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

The QFA program supports key professors and their research, with the goal of strengthening Qualcomm’s engagement with faculty who also play a key role in Qualcomm’s recruiting of top graduate students.

Krishna was chosen for the QFA for his contributions to the modeling, analysis, and design of high-performance, energy-efficient hardware acceleration platforms. 

Data movement is a key challenge in modern computing platforms, especially for Big Data applications like machine learning, on the edge and the cloud. The latency and energy cost of communicating data from memory to the chip often surpasses that of the actual computation, limiting scalability. 

Krishna’s lab has been working on specific solutions to mitigate this challenge. His research has developed systematic mechanisms to understand the relationship between computation mapping and the resulting off-chip/on-chip communication. They also develop interconnection topologies and communication protocols to optimize system performance and energy efficiency. Several Georgia Tech ECE graduate students who have worked with Krishna on these topics through his advanced courses and research projects are now researchers at Qualcomm.

Raychowdhury was chosen for the QFA for his contributions to low-power system-on-a-chip (SoC) design, including his group’s work on embedded power management and delivery circuits that have impacted Qualcomm’s internal research and development.  

Fine-grain power management plays a critical role in improving the energy efficiency of low-power SoCs and requires a closed-loop control between system software and embedded hardware. Over the last several years, Raychowdhury’s group has pioneered novel control topologies for improving the integration and performance of embedded voltage regulators and the co-regulation of voltage and clocking circuits. Raychowdhury's students have obtained multiple Best Paper Awards and scholarships based on their work, and several of his Ph.D. graduates are now researchers at Qualcomm’s Processor Research Group.

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