Top Candidates for the 2021 Women of the Year STEAM Awards

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The Women in Technology's (WIT) Awards celebrate women in STEAM who live in the state of Georgia for their accomplishments as leaders in business, visionaries, and women who make a difference in their communities. There's also one award presented to a Georgia-based man that champions for women in their networks, workplaces, and communities

Three GTRI employees have been identified as top candidates for WIT Women of the Year in STEAM Awards.

  • Alexa Harter, a candidate for the 2021 Women of the Year in STEAM Awards - Engineering Category.
  • Leigh McCook, a candidate for the 2021 Women of the Year in STEAM Awards - STEAM Education Category

  • Mark Mitchell, a candidate for the 2021 Women of the Year in STEAM - Build Her Up Category

Three Georgia Tech employees are also up for awards:

  • Pinar Keskinocak, a candidate for the 2021 Women of the Year in STEAM Awards - Mathematics Category. 

  • Elizabeth Mynatt, a candidate for the 2021 Women of the Year in STEAM Awards - Technology Category

  • Johnna Temenoff, a candidate for the 2021 Women of the Year in STEAM Awards - Science Category

WIT is excited to announce their 29th Women of The Year Awards will be held on Oct. 16, at the Mercedes-Benz Stadium. Being identified as a top candidate is an immense honor. We look forward to finding out if any of these amazing people win their categories.

 

Written by: Katrina Heitz

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Atlanta, GA

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michelle.gowdy@gtri.gatech.edu

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Michelle Gowdy

Michelle.Gowdy@gtri.gatech.edu

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Saeedifard Chosen for C3E Technology Research & Innovation Award

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Maryam Saeedifard

Maryam Saeedifard has been named as the recipient of the 2021 U.S. Clean Energy Education and Empowerment (C3E) Technology Research & Innovation Award. Saeedifard holds the Dean’s Professorship in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE). 

She will be presented with this award at the 2021 U.S. C3E Women in Clean Energy Symposium, to be held virtually November 3-4. This awards program recognizes mid-career leadership and achievement and is administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, Stanford University’s Precourt Institute for Energy, the Texas A&M Energy Institute, and the MIT Energy Initiative. 

Saeedifard is being recognized for her expertise on clean/renewable energy conversion and carbon dioxide emissions reduction, based on using advanced power electronics-based energy conversion technologies. During her career, she has developed novel, extremely efficient (greater than 98%) power conversion circuits for low-cost and reliable energy harvesting of large-scale wind and photovoltaic farms. 

Another area on which Saeedifard has focused is the control, expansion, and protection of High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission systems for energy and savings. She has worked to improve transmission resiliency of bulk power transmission of renewable energy resources over long distances. 

Saeedifard’s leadership in IEEE professional societies, IEEE journals, and educational contributions will also be recognized at this event. She has been a member of the Georgia Tech ECE faculty since 2014.

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Atlanta, GA

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jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

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Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Wang Appointed as IEEE MTT-S Distinguished Microwave Lecturer

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Hua Wang has been appointed as a Distinguished Microwave Lecturer for the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society (MTT-S) for the period of 2022-2024. Wang is an associate professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

An IEEE MTT-S Distinguished Microwave Lecturer typically deliver five to seven talks per year. For each class of these lecturers, only three or four are selected worldwide each year. Manos Tentzeris, who is ECE’s Ken Byers Professor in Flexible Electronics, previously served in this role from 2010-2012.

During his two-year term as an IEEE MTT-S Distinguished Microwave Lecturer, Wang will lecture on broadband and energy-efficient RF/mm-Wave/THz integrated circuits and systems for beyond-5G and 6G communications and sensing. He will also speak on wireless systems for ultra-reliable low latency communications (URLLC), sensing, and hardware security.

Wang is the director of the Georgia Tech Center of Circuits and Systems (CCS), and he leads the Georgia Tech Electronics and Micro-Systems (GEMS) Lab. His research interests include innovating analog, RF, mm-Wave, and THz integrated circuits and hybrid systems for wireless communications, sensing, and bioelectronics applications.

Wang is the recipient of the 2020 DARPA Director's Fellowship, 2020 Qualcomm Faculty Award, 2018 DARPA Young Faculty Award, 2017 IEEE MTT-S Outstanding Young Engineer Award, and 2015 National Science Foundation CAREER Award. He held the Georgia Tech ECE Demetrius T. Paris Professorship from 2014-2018.

Ph.D. Student Caleb Ju Receives Premier DOE Fellowship for High Performance Computing

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Caleb Ju, a Ph.D. student in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) has been awarded a highly competitive Department of Energy Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (DOE CSGF). The DOE CSGF is a four-year-long fellowship that provides robust benefits and opportunities to students pursuing doctoral degrees in fields that use high-performance computing (HPC) to solve complex science and engineering problems. 

Ju’s research interest primarily focuses on creating scalable optimization algorithms with applications to problems such as decision making under uncertainty.

“Since I am interested in both theory and practice, I specifically applied to the math and computer science track of the fellowship,” said Ju. "I enjoy designing algorithms from scratch, analyzing their theoretical properties, and applying those results to software to solve real-world problems."

Most of Ju’s application discussed research from his time spent as an undergraduate student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; he worked to solve large-scale graph problems – some of which included over 200 million edges – using a unique method.

“Instead of solving graph problems using a discrete method, we solved it using continuous optimization, specifically linear programming,” Ju elaborated. “One advantage of our approach is generality. While general solutions are typically slower, our algorithm with an efficient line search becomes competitive with some of the fastest discrete methods. This means users of our software can get the same performance as specialized codes, without needing to spend months developing new algorithms and software.”

While the award emphasizes HPC research, Ju is a nontraditional winner of the fellowship. He originally applied for the funds while a graduate student in Georgia Tech’s College of Computing, planning to research computer science with HPC applications. He has since transferred to ISyE, where he will be advised by A. Russell Chandler III Associate Professor George Lan, with a focus on operations research.

“I often found the algorithms used to solve an optimization problem were not well-suited for today’s supercomputers due to large data movement between processors, lack of parallelism, and so forth,” said Ju. “By transferring to ISyE, I will be able to combine my training in mathematical modeling and optimization, as well as my background in computer science, to design new algorithms cognizant of modern computer architectures to achieve better performance.”

Lan said, “My warmest congratulations go out to Caleb for winning this highly competitive award. With the support of DOE CSFG, Caleb will work with me on the design of efficient dynamic stochastic optimization algorithms that can both exploit problem structures and utilize HPC in an effective manner.”

While he is interested in optimization, generally, Ju also keeps in mind possible applications for his work. One example of this is reinforcement learning.

“In this area, with the use of fast optimization algorithms, machines can outperform humans in video games,” he explained.” I am looking to extend these results to help solve fundamental scientific and engineering problems.

“I try to keep in mind what the application will be, and whether it will be useful to a scientist or engineer,” Ju added.

The original version of this news release was written by Kristen Perez.

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Atlanta, GA

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Shelley Wunder-Smith

H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering

Calhoun Elected as OHBM Fellow

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Vince Calhoun

Vince Calhoun has been elected as a Fellow of the Organization of Human Brain Mapping (OHBM). OHBM is an international society dedicated to using neuroimaging to discover the organization of the human brain.

Calhoun is the Distinguished University Professor of Psychology at Georgia State University. He is the director of the Center for Advanced Brain Imaging, a joint venture between Georgia State University and Georgia Tech. Calhoun is also the founding director of the Center for Translational Research in Neuroimaging and Data Science, a tri-institutional effort supported by Georgia State, Georgia Tech, and Emory University to increase cooperation among Atlanta brain imaging researchers.

Calhoun is a Georgia Research Alliance (GRA) Eminent Scholar in Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics, and he also holds appointments in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech and in neurology and psychiatry at Emory University School of Medicine. His research is focused on developing new ways to analyze and use complex brain imaging data by drawing on advanced machine-learning approaches.

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Atlanta, GA

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jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

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Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Jeff Wu Receives Sigma Xi’s Monie A. Ferst Award

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Jeff Wu, Coca-Cola Chair in Engineering Statistics and professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), has been honored with Sigma Xi’s Monie A. Ferst Award. This national-level award, sponsored by Georgia Tech’s Sigma Xi chapter, recognizes those who have made "notable contributions to the motivation and encouragement of research through education." Wu joins just a handful of Institute faculty members who have been so recognized since the award’s inception in 1977.

Wu’s dedication to educating future researchers can be seen throughout his distinguished academic career. He has supervised 49 doctoral students, 35 of whom are teaching in major research departments or institutions in statistics, engineering, and business around the globe.

In their award nomination letter, ISyE School Chair Edwin Romeijn, A. Russell Chandler III Professor Roshan Joseph, and Associate Professor Enlu Zhou noted that "[Dr. Wu is considered a visionary in statistics, which is exemplified by his famous 1997 lecture 'Statistics=Data Science?' a term now embraced by people all over the world. ... Dr. Wu has influenced multiple generations of researchers and students through his devoted teaching and mentoring. … More than 1,800 papers are published by his students to date without Dr. Wu being a co-author. Four of his former students have become editors of Technometrics and Journal of Quality Technology, two of the most prominent journals in engineering statistics. His students would agree on one thing: Dr. Wu is more than a research advisor. He remains in their lives as a mentor, friend, and guide even after graduation.”

The Monie A. Ferst Award is not the only prestigious honor Wu has received this spring. He has also been given the Class of 1934 Distinguished Professor Award, the highest honor Georgia Tech can bestow on a faculty member. These two awards are the latest in a long line of accolades for Wu, which include his 2004 election to the National Academy of Engineering as the first academic statistician so chosen. In addition, Wu has won almost all awards given in the field of engineering statistics, including the ENBIS Box Medal and Shewhart Medal.

“This award came as a pleasant surprise and gives me consolation during this difficult time,” said Wu. “Educating and mentoring students is like polishing diamonds – it takes patience and effort, and the whole process is inspiring and rewarding.”

On November, 11, 2021, Wu will be honored for this achievement with an in-person symposium. The proceedings will begin with a continental breakfast, followed by four sessions of 30-minute presentations by colleagues and friends of Wu, and an evening banquet that will wrap up the event. The list of presenters is as follows:

  • Xinwei Deng (Virginia Tech)
  • Derek Bingham (Simon Fraser University, Canada)
  • Jing Li (Georgia Tech)
  • Devon Lin (Queen's University, Canada)
  • Simon Mak (Duke University)
  • Matt Plumlee (Northwestern University)
  • Arman Sabaghi (Purdue University)
  • Rui Tuo (Texas A&M University)
  • Yao Xie (Georgia Tech)
  • Shifeng Xiong (Chinese Academy of Science)

About the Monie A. Ferst Award

The Monie A. Ferst Award is named eponymously for the engineer and businessman who graduated with a degree in mechanical engineering from Georgia Tech in 1911 and helped found the Georgia Tech Research Institute. The award comes with a medal and $10,000. In addition, a day-long symposium is held to showcase the achievements of the winner’s former students.

About Sigma Xi

Founded at Cornell University in 1886, Sigma Xi, the scientific research honor society, is the international honor society of science and engineering. One of the oldest and largest scientific organizations in the world, Sigma Xi has a distinguished history of service to science and society. It has nearly 60,000 members in over 500 chapters around the world.

 

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Atlanta, GA

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swundersmith3@gatech.edu

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Shelley Wunder-Smith

H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering

Khan Chosen for DARPA Young Faculty Award

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Asif Khan

Asif Khan has been chosen for a DARPA Young Faculty Award. Khan is an assistant professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), where he has been on the faculty since 2017.

Khan is receiving this award for his research on ferroelectric field-effect transistors for embedded non-volatile memory applications. Ferroelectric field-effect transistors is one of the most-promising device technologies for artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) hardware, due to its energy efficiency and compatibility with high-volume semiconductor manufacturing. The project will focus on solving the critical voltage problem of this device technology, by identifying and implementing new strategies for interface defect reduction in and the downscaling of the ferroelectric gate-dielectric stack. 

Khan works on advanced semiconductor devices that will shape the future of computing in the post-scaling era. His research group currently focuses on ferroelectric devices in all aspects ranging from materials physics, growth, and electron microscopy to device fabrication, all the way to ferroelectric circuits and systems for AI/ML/data-centric applications.

His early career work led to the first experimental proof-of-concept demonstration of a physical phenomenon, namely the negative capacitance, in ferroelectric materials, which can reduce the power dissipation in electronic devices below the “fundamental” thermodynamic limit. Negative capacitance is currently a vibrant research area in materials science, condensed matter physics, and electrical engineering, and it is being pursued by all major semiconductor companies for advanced transistor technologies.

In the past, Khan has received multiple awards, including the NSF CAREER Award (2021), the Intel Rising Star Award (2020), Qualcomm Innovation Fellowship (2012), TSMC Outstanding Student Research Award (2011), and the University Gold Medal from Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (2011). He was also named to the Center for Teaching and Learning Class of 1934 CIOS Honor Roll for his outstanding teaching in ECE8863 Quantum Computing Devices and Hardware in Fall 2020.

Khan’s group currently consists of seven graduate students and two research staff members. They publish in flagship microelectronics conferences, such as the International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) and the Symposium on VLSI Technology, and in journals including IEEE Electron Device LettersIEEE Transactions on Electron DevicesNature ElectronicsNature Materials, and Nano Letters. His students received multiple international and Institute-level awards, including the IEEE EDS Masters Student Fellowship (Prasanna Ravindran, 2020) and the Georgia Tech ECE's Colonel Oscar P. Cleaver Award (Nujhat Tasneem in 2018 and Zheng Wang in 2017) for achieving the highest score on the ECE Ph.D. preliminary examination, which was the criteria for the award up to 2018.

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Atlanta, GA

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jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

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Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Cressler, Romberg Honored with Prestigious IEEE Medals

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John Cressler (left) and Justin Romberg

John D. Cressler and Justin K. Romberg, both faculty members from the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), have been awarded with two of the most prestigious honors presented by the IEEE, the world’s largest technical professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for the benefit of humanity.

Cressler and Romberg were both honored with IEEE medals at the IEEE Vision, Innovation, and Challenges Summit (IEEE VIC Summit) and Honors Ceremony, held virtually May 11-13, 2021. Cressler was honored with the 2021 IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal for a career of outstanding contributions to education in the fields of interest to IEEE. Romberg was honored as a co-recipient of the 2021 IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal for outstanding contributions in signal processing.

John D. Cressler

As the recipient of the 2021 IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal, Cressler was honored “for inspirational teaching and mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students.” He was recognized with this award on May 11 by IEEE President-Elect Ray Liu.

Cressler is the third faculty member from ECE to receive this honor. Previous recipients include Ronald W. Schafer (1992) and James D. Meindl (1990, while with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute). The James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal was established in 1956 and is sponsored by Lockheed Martin, MathWorks, Pearson, and the IEEE Life Members Fund.

“This is a tremendous honor for John, and his commitment to teaching and mentoring — and to the success and well-being of our students – is a tremendous model for all of us to follow,” said Magnus Egerstedt, Steve W. Chaddick School Chair and Professor in ECE.

Cressler is the Schlumberger Chair Professor in Electronics and the Ken Byers Teaching Fellow in Science and Religion at Georgia Tech. He has been the associate director of the Georgia Electronic Design Center since 2015. Cressler joined the Georgia Tech ECE faculty in 2002 after spending a decade as a faculty member in the Department of ECE at Auburn University. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in applied physics at Columbia University and his B.S. degree in physics from Georgia Tech in 1984.

Cressler couples his passions for teaching and mentoring with being the leader of one of the largest, most visible, and most productive silicon-germanium (SiGe) research groups in the world. He and his colleagues have written over 700 refereed journal and conference papers, and he has graduated over 100 Ph.D. and master’s students who are now leaders in the electronics industry, academia, and government and research labs or who have started their own successful companies.

Cressler is a mainstay in the microelectronics instructional program in ECE and has introduced first-of-a-kind courses – CoE 3002 Introduction to the Microelectronics and Nanotechnology Revolution and ECE 6444 Silicon-based Heterostructure Devices and Circuits – that use textbooks that he has written and that have been adopted by other universities around the world. He also teaches IAC 2002 Science, Engineering, and Religion: An Interfaith Dialogue in the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts. This course is open to undergraduate students of all years and majors and has always been positively received by the students.

Cressler has received many top teaching and mentoring awards from Georgia Tech and from IEEE and Eta Kappa Nu. His goal for his Ph.D. students is to fall in love with research, while maintaining a good work-life balance, and to provide a safe place to fail and to be creative and innovative. In the classroom, Cressler believes that the keys to success are passion for what you teach, being real, being and sharing who you are and what you believe with your students, and being approachable and showing that you care.

Cressler said that teaching is his life and vocation, and he counts teaching and mentoring as his great passion in the classroom, lab, and life. “My accomplishments are best measured by the success of my students,” Cressler said. “Receiving an award for teaching and mentoring, which is something very close to my heart, means a great deal to me.”

To view Cressler’s award presentation from the IEEE VIC Summit and Honors Ceremony, please visit https://ieeetv.ieee.org/channels/communities/awards-hall-c-day-1-ieee-vic-summit-and-honors-ceremony. His presentation starts at the 6:40 mark.

Justin K. Romberg

As a co-recipient of the 2021 IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal, Romberg was honored “for groundbreaking contributions to compressed sensing.” He received this medal with his colleagues, Emmanuel Candes, who holds The Barnum-Simons Chair in Mathematics and Statistics at Stanford University, and Terence Tao, a professor of mathematics at the University of California at Los Angeles.

Romberg and his colleagues were recognized with this award on May 12 by IEEE President-Elect Liu. He is the fourth faculty member from ECE to receive this honor. Previous recipients include Thomas P. Barnwell (2014), Ronald W. Schafer (2010), and James H. McClellan (2004). The IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal was established in 1995 and is sponsored by the Kilby Medal Fund.

“This is a tremendous honor for Justin, and our amazing faculty track record in receiving this award speaks of the high regard in which our digital signal processing program is held around the world,” said Egerstedt.

Romberg holds the Schlumberger Professorship and is the associate chair for Research in ECE. He is also the senior director for the Center for Machine Learning at Georgia Tech. Romberg joined the ECE faculty in 2006 after working as a postdoctoral scholar in Applied and Computational Mathematics at Caltech for three years. He received his B.S.E.E., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Rice University in 1997, 1999, and 2004, respectively.

Romberg, Candes, and Tao were recognized for their 2006 paper, “Robust Uncertainty Principles: Exact Reconstruction from Highly Incomplete Frequency Information,” which demonstrated that structured signal samples could be reconstructed perfectly from very few samples. The paper established the field of compressed sensing, which is considered one of the most important developments in signal processing in the last 50 years.

This paper spurred a flurry of research activities, with engineers and scientists exploring ways to use compressed sensing in a variety of applications. Compressed sensing has been used in wireless sensor networks, more efficient data aggregation, and improved data recovery, and has resulted in energy-efficient network routing protocols, reduced data transmission requirements, and improved network security.

Compressed sensing has even been used in astrological imaging and medical imaging. The first images of black holes from the Event Horizon Telescope were based on compressed sensing reconstruction methods. However, the greatest success of compressed sensing can be found in MRI imaging, where the technology is used to shorten the imaging process drastically without losing image quality.

Romberg said that one of the best things about the work in compressed sensing is how it has introduced him to ideas and people in many different areas of applied mathematics, such as harmonic analysis, optimization, and applied probability and statistical learning.

“It has been extremely rewarding to be exposed to new ideas from these fields by interacting with researchers on a common problem set,” Romberg said. “It has also been a pleasure to see how this early work was translated into different problem domains and built a strong foundation for me across disciplinary research, which is something that I have valued throughout my career.”

To view Romberg’s award presentation from the IEEE VIC Summit and Honors Ceremony, please visit https://ieeetv.ieee.org/channels/communities/awards-hall-a-day-2-ieee-vic-summit-and-honors-ceremony. His presentation starts at the 4:55 mark.

Molzahn Selected for IEEE PES Outstanding Young Engineer Award

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Daniel Molzahn

Daniel Molzahn has been named as the recipient of the 2021 IEEE Power and Energy Society (PES) Outstanding Young Engineer Award. Molzahn will be recognized with this award at the IEEE PES General Meeting, to be held July 25-29 in a virtual format. 

This award is presented to engineers who are 35 years of age or younger for technical and educational achievements and for involvement in local/transnational IEEE PES activities and leadership, professional society activities, and community and humanitarian activities. 

Molzahn has been an assistant professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) since 2019. His research focuses on improving power system reliability and resiliency by developing and analyzing algorithms that help engineers better design and operate power grids. Challenges addressed by his work include power flow nonlinearities, large-scale problems, stochasticity from renewables, and the transition from centralized to distributed paradigms. His major contributions to the field are in power flow nonlinearities, large-scale security-constrained optimal power flow, and distributed optimization. 

Molzahn is a leader for the Power Systems Computation Conference (PSCC). He currently serves as the chair of the technical program committee for the 22nd PSCC to be held in 2022; he was the vice-chair of the technical program committee for the 21st PSCC held in 2020. Molzahn has also been a reviewer and session chair for earlier editions of the PSCC and a member of past technical program committees. He and his colleagues won second place at the U.S. Department of Energy ARPA-E Grid Optimization Challenge in 2020. He was a guest associate editor for special issues of the IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid and the IEEE Journal of Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics

At Georgia Tech, Molzahn is a fellow of the Strategic Energy Institute and the faculty advisor for the Georgia Tech Energy Club. He is also involved in activities with the U.S. National Academy of Engineers (NAE). Molzahn was invited to attend the NAE-organized 2019 German-American Frontiers of Engineering (FOE) Symposium, and he accepted a request to serve on the organizing committee for the 2020 EU-US NAE FOE Symposium, which will now be held in November 2021.

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Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Khan Wins NSF CAREER Award

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Asif Khan

Asif Khan has been named as a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award. He is an assistant professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and also holds a courtesy appointment in the School of Materials Science and Engineering.

The title of Khan’s award is “Antiferroelectric Negative Capacitance Transistors for Ultra-low Power Computing,” and it will start on March 15, 2021 and end on February 28, 2026. 

Today's society is experiencing an unprecedented growth of its digital footprint – be it in the form of uploading a photo on Facebook, live-streaming a teaching module to a massive global audience on YouTube, or commandeering a revolution via Twitter. This convenience of modern computing, however, comes with a steep cost in terms of energy use and environmental impact. Today, the global information infrastructure, such as data centers, emit as much greenhouse gases as that of the state of Nevada or a country, such as The Netherlands or Malaysia, and constitute around 1 percent of world-wide electricity demand. According to scientific estimates, this fraction may increase to a double digit percentage in the next 15-20 years. 

At the core of this predicament lies the fact that the fundamental building blocks of digital hardware – the transistors – have long been overdue for a prime upgrade in terms of their energy efficiencies. The proposed research aims to explore an energy-efficient transistor concept – known as a negative capacitance field-effect transistor, using a new class of materials called antiferroelectric oxides. 

Khan joined the ECE faculty in 2017. His research is on advanced semiconductor devices—devices that will shape the future of computing in the post-scaling era. His research group currently focuses on ferroelectric devices, in all aspects ranging from materials physics, growth, and electron microscopy to device fabrication, all the way to ferroelectric circuits and systems for artificial intelligence/machine learning/data-centric applications. Khan’s Ph.D. work led to the proof-of-concept demonstration of the negative capacitance phenomenon in ferroelectric materials, which can reduce the power dissipation in electronic devices below the ‘fundamental’ thermodynamic limit. This culminated in the initial development of the field of negative capacitance.

Khan has published 2 book chapters and 70 journal and peer-reviewed conference publications, and he has given 20 invited talks and tutorials at premier microelectronics and ferroelectric conferences. Khan currently has one patent pending at Intel. 

Khan’s awards include the NSF CAREER award (2021), Intel Rising Star Award (2020), Qualcomm Innovation Fellowship (2012), TSMC Outstanding Student Research Award (2011), and the University Gold Medal from Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (2011). His group at Georgia Tech consists of six Ph.D. students and three research engineers, many of whom won Institute-level and international awards, including an IEEE Electron Devices Society (EDS) Masters Student Fellowship (2020). Khan’s research is supported by the National Science Foundation, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Semiconductor Research Corporation, and Intel Corporation. 

Khan has also developed a graduate course, ECE 8863A Quantum Computing Devices and Hardware, as a part of the campus wide response to the national prioritization of quantum computing, known as the National Quantum Initiative Act (NQIA) that was signed by the U.S. president in 2018. Khan recently received the Class of 1934 CIOS Honor Roll award for excellence in teaching this course in Fall 2020. 

Location

Atlanta, GA

Email

jackie.nemeth@ece.gatech.edu

Contact

Jackie Nemeth

School of Electrical and Computer Engineering

404-894-2906

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